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Visitor
tlbrown2
Total Posts: 3
Registered on: ‎04-04-2012

Exercise and Glucose Spikes

This morning I took my fasting glucose and was 118, not bad since I ate more carbs than I should have the day before. I went to the health club ran 2.5 miles lifted some weights, took a shower got ready to go to the office, and went home to eat breakfast. On a whim I retook my glucose and was at 205. Does anyone else suffer from spikes in their glucose levels after exercise?

Super Advisor
yellocanoe
Total Posts: 3,149
Registered on: ‎11-02-2009

Re: Exercise and Glucose Spikes


tlbrown2 wrote:

This morning I took my fasting glucose and was 118, not bad since I ate more carbs than I should have the day before. I went to the health club ran 2.5 miles lifted some weights, took a shower got ready to go to the office, and went home to eat breakfast. On a whim I retook my glucose and was at 205. Does anyone else suffer from spikes in their glucose levels after exercise?


Hi tlbrown2 & welcome,

 

First thing is you should post this over on the Type 2 boards or Type 1 boards whichever you are.  You will get a lot more responses there, this is kind of a everything but diabetes board. 

 

In answer to your question, yes exercise can definately make your BG go higher.  It raises cortisol levels in your body, some people go lower and others go higher.  If you are a T2, are you exercising before or after breakfast?  Exercising on an empty stomach can lead to your liver dumping too much glucose in response to the need.  I typically will eat around 25 carbs before prolonged exercise as I know that should cover the carbs I am burning and keep my BG from spiking or falling.

 

Tom

Diagnosed T2 October, 2009  A1c 6.8
Currently on Metformin ER 1000mg per day
Last A1c 09/21/2013  5.4
lizzylou
Total Posts: 13,930
Topics: 565
High Fives: 1,994
Solutions: 142
Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

Re: Exercise and Glucose Spikes


tlbrown2 wrote:

This morning I took my fasting glucose and was 118, not bad since I ate more carbs than I should have the day before. I went to the health club ran 2.5 miles lifted some weights, took a shower got ready to go to the office, and went home to eat breakfast. On a whim I retook my glucose and was at 205. Does anyone else suffer from spikes in their glucose levels after exercise?


Yes TL, many do.  It's always a bad idea to exercise on an empty stomach, especially first thing in the morning when your numbers are already higher from your body's overnight processing.

 

Here are some links about the situation:

 

http://lizzysdlounge.com/2012/03/14/d-p-or-why-are-my-morning-numbers-so-high/

 

http://lizzysdlounge.com/2012/03/15/whats-a-liver-dump/

 

http://lizzysdlounge.com/2012/03/17/carbexercise-chart-2/

 

As Tom said, you should post this on the type-1 or 2 board for more responce.  This is our "shooting-the-breeze" forum. :smileyvery-happy:

 

Lizzy 

 

 

Knowledge is Power!





Here's some useful links, click on the titles


Testing 101
 
 All About Carbs

Resources For The Un-insured and Discount Medicine and Equipment

LizzyLou Videos



Lizzy's Blog
for lots more  


Visitor
tlbrown2
Total Posts: 3
Registered on: ‎04-04-2012

Re: Exercise and Glucose Spikes

Thanks for your input Tom, it was very helpful. Yes, I am type 2 diagnosed 5/09. My A1C last February was 5.8. I have over the last couple of weeks been moderately exercising at 6 am prior to work and on an empty stomach, but eating ASAP 4 Carbs with protein subsequent to exercising. I running 2.5 miles and lifting weights to get my BMI down from 31 to 28. I wasn't thinking about the liver dumping although it's what came to mind when I tested after exercising today. Based on the chart supplied I will get some Ensure with Protein and drink it prior to going to exercise tomorrow to see if that helps. It really freaked me out when I saw such a high GL number subsequent to a high normal GL. My goal with exercise and diet is to get off Metformin Extended to just diet and exercising. I retire later on this year and what to get off both the medfromin and high blood pressure medication prior to retiring. Again thanks for your feedback and help!

 

Terry

Visitor
tlbrown2
Total Posts: 3
Registered on: ‎04-04-2012

Re: Exercise and Glucose Spikes

Thanks for the information Lizzy it was very helpful and from now on I will post to the right forum. I am a newbie in posting to the ADA sight.

 

Terry

Trusted Contributor
morrisolder
Total Posts: 10,712
Registered on: ‎11-28-2009

Re: Exercise and Glucose Spikes

Most of us know that exercise lowers blood sugar levels—except when they go up instead.  How can that be?

 

In most cases the food that we eat is converted to more glucose than we can use for energy at the moment when we are eating. So the excess is stored for use later. Some of this is in our blood, available for immediate demands, but about 80% of the excess is stored in our muscles and organs, and can be drawn on directly as needed, and about 20% is stored in our liver.

 

When we exercise we use the glucose that is stored in our muscles. If we exercise enough, however, we use that local supply up, and start drawing on our blood sugar for exercise. So the first effect is that exercise lowers blood sugar. Depending on our glucose level prior to beginning our activities, that blood glucose will fuel our energy demands for a longer or shorter period.

 

If we go long enough, and don’t have any new input of glucose from eating, our blood sugar will drop lower and lower. When it gets to somewhere around 55 or 60, our hormones signal our liver to start releasing the glucose stored there into our blood. In effect the liver acts as one end of our blood sugar thermostat, the other end being our pancreas, which releases insulin when blood sugar starts going too high.

 

Up to this point this is totally normal biology, but remember that we have diabetes. When the diabetic liver goes into action, a couple of things can go wrong. The trigger might come too soon—glucose is released when we hit 100 rather than 60. Or too much glucose is released, or the normal accompanying release of insulin that helps us use the glucose for energy is stalled or minimized. Any of these can result in higher blood glucose.

 

Note that this would be more likely in the morning when we are often subject to rising glucose numbers until we eat, even without exercise, due to dawn phenomenon...

 

The good news is that this effect of exercise is temporary. The storage of glucose in our muscle cells has been depleted and our bodies will seek to rebuild that reserve. This can take up to 24 hours maybe even longer in some cases, depending on the duration and intensity of the exercise or activity.  And where do the muscles get that glucose from? From the blood, so that exercise ends up lowering blood sugar for quite a long period following exercise, even when the initial result may be higher.

 

The strategy to avoid that temporary high from exercise is quite simple—avoid going so low that your blood sugar rebounds. Keep the liver on the sidelines. So if your blood sugar is below a certain level, have a snack before exercise. If the exercise goes on for an extended period, have a few more carbs every so often.  Somebody developed a chart that has carb recommendations based on starting blood sugar levels, intensity, and duration of exercise.  The specifics may or may not be right for you, but the concepts are pretty basic and summed up by looking at the chart, which you can find HERE

http://www.dietsite.com/dt/Diets/Diabetes/DiabeticSnacksBeforeExercise.asp

 

Morris

Diagnosed Type 2, with an A1c of 11.4 in 2003; averaging a 5.0 A1c since then with diet, exercise and Glipizide XL + meds for blood pressure and cholesterol. 
A bit dated, but scroll down on this page if you want to know more ...


Long Lost Member
wdove511
Total Posts: 9
Registered on: ‎06-11-2012

Re: Exercise and Glucose Spikes

I personally have had similar experiences with post-exercise spikes.  And also the other way as well (hypoglycemia).

 

It's sometimes very frustrating.

 

BUt i think spike or no spike in blood sugar - exercise is good.   I just would like to be able to keep a better handle on this.

 

BILL