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lizzylou
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Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

Re: Type 1.5 diabetes


cinnamonspice wrote:

I was recently diagnosed type 1.5 diabetes.  At present, I am on medications.  I was told eventually I may be on insulin.  So far, my BG numbers have been good.  Is type1.5 a rare disease and how long would it take before I start on insulin more or less?



Hi Spicy girl,

 

I've been reading all of the comment, thought you might like to hear from a real live LADA/type 1.5!:smileyvery-happy:

 

I was originally diagnosed as a type-2 but never really fit the "mold" so to speak.  After a short time it became apparent that I wasn't a type-2.  By that time I had requested to be put on insulin because I wanted the most natural medication available.  This was over 8 years ago, 

 

You can stay on oral medications for as long as they work, many people have.  There's really no time limit and it all depends on your body.  Some people very quickly have to start insulin, others can take years for this to happen.

 

I am pretty much convinced that starting on insulin relatively early has slowed the progression for me.  I do still produce insulin, although not enough to go without medication.  I'm apparently pretty rare in the fact that I still do produce it after all these years, but I'm not complaining.

 

You can also be insulin resistant and metformin can help not only with that put also with liver issues that can raise BG levels.  Many type-1's are also insulin resistant and take metformin for various reasons.  Diabetes is about a lot more than your beta-cells, your liver also plays a role in it too, and each person is different.  To categorize any person of any type into a set "mold" is just plain incorrect.

 

If you have any questions for one who walks the talk feel free to ask me.  It's a good sign that your numbers are currently good on oral meds., which one(s) do you take?

 

Lizzy

Knowledge is Power!





Here's some useful links, click on the titles


Testing 101
 
 All About Carbs

Resources For The Un-insured and Discount Medicine and Equipment

LizzyLou Videos



Lizzy's Blog
for lots more  


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cinnamonspice
Total Posts: 7
Registered on: ‎02-11-2012

Re: Type 1.5 diabetes

Hi Lizzy...thank you so very much for the info.  I just called the office of my endocrinologist because for the past couple of days, I've been feeling nauseated.  I also woke up very sluggish with kinda wobbly legs.  I did check my BG level and it was 122.  Then I had a small bowl of cereal with one slice of whole grain toast...two hours later, my sugar level was 164.  I was sooo very sleepy...took a nap for about an hour...then just before I had lunch, checked my BG level again and it was 131.  I'm just waiting for the nurse practitioner to call me back.  Currrently I am taking Januvia 100mg and Glumetza 500mg, two pills of Glumetza and one pill of Januvia every morning.  I tried metformin first and after taking two pills, I had major diarrhea for three days and I ended up in the Emergency Room.  I don't like this roller coaster feeling.  Yesterday, after I walked a mile and a half, I checked my BG level and it was 89 and I was feeling kinda shakey.  I am 59 and my doctor asked me if I have a family history of diabetes and I told him not to my knowledge unless either my mother or my father didn't know.  It threw me for a loop when I was diagnosed.  I have always played tennis throughout my life...then I quit playing about two years ago because I had back surgery and since then I had been playing golf but not too often.  Guess it just caught up with me.  The nurse practitioner told me I was unique having LADA 1.5.  This is all new to me but I'm learning.

lizzylou
Total Posts: 13,930
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Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

Re: Type 1.5 diabetes

LADA might be unique to the nurse, but it's really not all that unique in general.  Most doctors diagnose adults as type-2, even though age has no baring on when a person can develop type-1.  In many ways they're pretty much behind the times.  Most people have never even heard of any type except 1 and 2.  There are more types than that, but that's all you mostly hear about.

 

You might want to start paying attention to carb counting and control, that will help your numbers even more than medication in many instances.

 

I'm in the process of developing a new blog, so I can't give you any links yet, but here's some info on Glumetza/extended release metformin:

 

 

Everything You Wanted to Know About Metformin

Metformin: Also know as Glucophage, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza, Obimet, Dianben, Diabex, Diaformin, and others.


An oral anti-diabetic from the biguanide class. It is the first-line drug for the treatment of type-2 diabetes (but is also used in type-1 diabetes with insulin resistance), particularly in overweight and obese people and those with normal kidney function. Evidence suggests it may be the best choice for people with heart failure. It is also used in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome(PCOS.)

It helps reduce LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and may aid weight loss. When prescribed appropriately, metformin causes few adverse side-affects—the most common is gastrointestinal upset—and, unlike many other anti-diabetic drugs, does not cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar)if used alone. Metformin (taken alone) does not induce hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia during intense
exercise has been documented, but is extremely rare.

It also does not cause weight gain, and may indeed produce minor weight loss. Metformin also modestly reduces LDL and triglyceride levels.

Side effects and warnings

The most serious potential side effect of metformin is lactic acidosis; this complication is very rare, and seems limited to those with impaired liver or kidney function. Stop ta metformin and seek immediate medical attention if you develop any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis:
unusual tiredness,
severe drowsiness,
chills, blue/cold skin,
muscle pain,
fast/difficult breathing,
unusually slow/irregular heartbeat.

A very serious allergic reaction to this drug is rare. However, seek immediate medical attention if you notice any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, including: rash, itching/swelling (especially of the face/tongue/throat), severe dizziness, trouble breathing.

The most common adverse effect of metformin is gastrointestinal upset, including diarrhea, cramps, nausea, vomiting and increased flatulence; metformin is more commonly associated with gastrointestinal side effects than most other anti-diabetic drugs. Gastrointestinal upset can cause severe discomfort for patients; it is most common when metformin is first administered, or when the dose is increased. The discomfort can often be avoided by beginning at a low dose and increasing the dose gradually. Gastrointestinal upset after prolonged, steady use is less common. The extended-release version(ER or XR) often produces less of these problems.

A metallic taste in the mouth may occur at first as your body adjusts to the medication.

Low blood sugar is rare but may occur, especially if you take other medications for diabetes, drink large amounts of alcohol, do unusually heavy exercise, or do not consume enough calories from food. Symptoms include cold sweat, blurred vision, dizziness, drowsiness, shakes, fast heartbeat, headache, fainting, tingling of the hands/feet, and hunger. It is a good habit to carry glucose tablets or gel to treat low blood sugar.

Before having surgery or any X-ray/scanning procedure using injectable iodinated contrast material(contrast dye), tell your doctor that you are taking this medication. You will need to temporarily stop this medication before the time of your surgery/procedure. Consult your doctor for further instructions. If medical professionals don't ask what drugs you are taking, be sure to mention it.

Don't drink alcohol in excess with metformin.



Now the first-hand experience stuff:

Unofficial Metformin ADA nick names: Metfartmin, Metformin Mambo, and Why Is There a Moose on the Loose in my GI Track.




Metformin can take from 4-12 weeks to fully build up in your system. Any increase in dose will also take that long. You will probably begin to see some changes in numbers after taking it for several weeks, but give it time to work fully.

To take an extra dose when levels are high will not help at all! Metformin doesn't work that way, see above for reasons why.

Always take with food. It helps with the gastrointestinal upset.

If you miss a dose, just take it when you remember. Because it doesn't work like some other diabetes medications the timing is not as important as the total daily dose.

Make sure you don't become dehydrated as this can cause more serious GI upset.

It's helpful to take the metformin with a full glass of water and also make sure to drink plenty of fluid throughout the day.


Lizzy

Knowledge is Power!





Here's some useful links, click on the titles


Testing 101
 
 All About Carbs

Resources For The Un-insured and Discount Medicine and Equipment

LizzyLou Videos



Lizzy's Blog
for lots more  


alan_s
Total Posts: 15,075
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Registered on: ‎10-30-2009

Re: Type 1.5 diabetes



cinnamonspice wrote:

Thanks, Ron.  Yes I am 59.  I was told my pancreas is secreting some insulin and they want me to continue on medication before I am put on insulin.  I am being monitored closely and I am to go back to the office in another month.  LADA is what I was diagnosed as.  Very confusing.


 

G'day and welcome.

 

Here are a couple of articles on LADA; which some doctors refer to (incorrectly) as type1.5:

 

LADA Diabetes

What is LADA

 

It can have a "honeymoon period" during which your body continues to produce insulin, but that slowly diminishes. There is no way we can predict how long your honeymoon will last; in general terms the older you are at diagnosis the longer the honeymoon, but we can't tell how far into it you are at diagnosis. So I am afraid we cannot answer this question:

how long would it take before I start on insulin more or less?

In the interim, I have several LADA friends in the UK who found two things helped. One was to act like it is Type 2 in the initial stages; that helped improve their menu and lifestyle in preparation for going on insulin. The second was to accept that insulin would eventually be necessary and to go on it earlier rather than later, rather than to become stricter and stricter with carb control and exercise.

 

This is a collection of suggestions I offer to new type 2s: Getting Started

Cheers, Alan, Type 2, d&e metformin 2000mg, Australia.
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
There is nothing I could eat I like more than my eyes.
Type 2 Diabetes - A Personal Journey(latest: Catering For Different Tastes When Cooking)
Born Under a Wandering Star (Latest: Budapest, Hungary)
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ronaka
Total Posts: 950
Registered on: ‎12-24-2011

Re: Type 1.5 diabetes


cinnamonspice wrote:

Currrently I am taking Januvia 100mg and Glumetza 500mg, two pills of Glumetza and one pill of Januvia every morning.  I tried metformin first and after taking two pills, I had major diarrhea for three days and I ended up in the Emergency Room. 


 

Januvia does help to stimulate insulin and will be helpful to a type 1.5 or LADA diabetic. But Glumetza is just an extended release version of metformin. Do you think you are resistant to insulin? Not wanting to be rude, but being overweight is often a clue that there is insulin resistance. If you are not, then the metformin may not be doing you much good, if your main issue is reduced insulin.

 

Ron

Not a doctor, only another T2 diabetic with, unfortunately 11 year experience. Be cautious about accepting advice, including mine, on medical conditions from the internet. It can be a good place to get ideas, but validate them with your doctor and other medical professionals first.
Trusted Contributor
morrisolder
Total Posts: 10,564
Registered on: ‎11-28-2009

Re: Type 1.5 diabetes


ronaka wrote:

Januvia does help to stimulate insulin and will be helpful to a type 1.5 or LADA diabetic. But Glumetza is just an extended release version of metformin. Do you think you are resistant to insulin? Not wanting to be rude, but being overweight is often a clue that there is insulin resistance. If you are not, then the metformin may not be doing you much good, if your main issue is reduced insulin.


Ron, although weight issues are often associated with insulin resistance, normal weight does not meant that metformin will be ineffective.  Although metformin does to some extent help with insulin resistance it's primary action relates to the way the liver releases glucose into the blood--it can affect how much glucose is released, and where the trigger is for such a release. That can make it very helpful for people who are of normal weight, regardless of whether they have insulin resistance or not...

Morris

Diagnosed Type 2, with an A1c of 11.4 in 2003; averaging a 5.0 A1c since then with diet, exercise and Glipizide XL + meds for blood pressure and cholesterol. 
A bit dated, but scroll down on this page if you want to know more ...


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Talvie
Total Posts: 3,424
Registered on: ‎10-30-2009

Re: Type 1.5 diabetes


morrisolder wrote:

ronaka wrote:

Januvia does help to stimulate insulin and will be helpful to a type 1.5 or LADA diabetic. But Glumetza is just an extended release version of metformin. Do you think you are resistant to insulin? Not wanting to be rude, but being overweight is often a clue that there is insulin resistance. If you are not, then the metformin may not be doing you much good, if your main issue is reduced insulin.


Ron, although weight issues are often associated with insulin resistance, normal weight does not meant that metformin will be ineffective.  Although metformin does to some extent help with insulin resistance it's primary action relates to the way the liver releases glucose into the blood--it can affect how much glucose is released, and where the trigger is for such a release. That can make it very helpful for people who are of normal weight, regardless of whether they have insulin resistance or not...


Which is my situation.  All I've ever used is metformin, and it has helped me lose 60 pounds and get down to a healthy weight....but I still have to take it because diet and exercise alone is not effective.  It has helped me keep my morning numbers is an almost "normal" range.


Talvie


"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." Anais Nin
Type 2 Diabetes diagnosed December 13, 2000 w/A1c of 7.6. June 2014 A1c 5.6 Controlling with diet and exercise, and 500mg daily of metformin.
Advisor
ronaka
Total Posts: 950
Registered on: ‎12-24-2011

Re: Type 1.5 diabetes


morrisolder wrote:

Ron, although weight issues are often associated with insulin resistance, normal weight does not meant that metformin will be ineffective.  Although metformin does to some extent help with insulin resistance it's primary action relates to the way the liver releases glucose into the blood--it can affect how much glucose is released, and where the trigger is for such a release. That can make it very helpful for people who are of normal weight, regardless of whether they have insulin resistance or not...


I am afraid I can't agree. If you are fit and trim and not a type 2 diabetic, metformin is about the poorest choice of a drug. Repaglinide, or any of the sulfonylureas would be a better choice if you are short of insulin. That is how type 1.5 of LADA can be very frustrating. Drugs are often prescribed that are not suitable.

I'm not saying that there isn't the occasional type 1 that may get some benefit from metformin as there are always some exceptions. In fact metformin does not work for some type 2's, but again that is the exception.

Ron

Not a doctor, only another T2 diabetic with, unfortunately 11 year experience. Be cautious about accepting advice, including mine, on medical conditions from the internet. It can be a good place to get ideas, but validate them with your doctor and other medical professionals first.
lizzylou
Total Posts: 13,930
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Re: Type 1.5 diabetes

By the way Spicy,

 

I forgot to tell you that I've also been taking Metformin myself for over 8 years.  While I don't have insulin resistance, as a matter of fact I'm very sensitive to insulin, I do have a "leaky liver" and the Metformin works very well for that.

 

It's a very fine medication that has multiple purposes and is very safe, once you get past the initial "GI side effects". :smileyembarrassed:

 

Lizzy

Knowledge is Power!





Here's some useful links, click on the titles


Testing 101
 
 All About Carbs

Resources For The Un-insured and Discount Medicine and Equipment

LizzyLou Videos



Lizzy's Blog
for lots more  


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cinnamonspice
Total Posts: 7
Registered on: ‎02-11-2012

Re: Type 1.5 diabetes

I'm 5'6" and only weigh 138 lbs.