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phx1967
Total Posts: 3
Registered on: ‎04-04-2013
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Lipitor and TYPE 2 Diabetes

My partner was prescribed Lipitor 10 years ago and shortly thereafter  was diagnosed with having TYPE 2 Diabetes, I ve been reading about the correlation between the 2. Is his doctor the one who is responsible for this?  What should he do?  He has been  taking Actos and Januvia this year Avandia last year  but they are getting so expensive  We can hardly afford to buy them, is there some other way? Plus he is stubborn and does not eat the way he should....even though I try....he cheats with unhealthy food all the time.  Help.  Please advise.

thanks,.

Tim

Nelsen Jay
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sugabutt
Total Posts: 21
Registered on: ‎01-15-2013

Re: Lipitor and TYPE 2 Diabetes

I don't know anything about those drugs, but if he insists on eating unhealthy, then no matter what pills they give him he's going to still be unhealthy.  Have you tried to do juicing?  Even one glass of fresh juice (stuff like spinach, kale, apple, pear, ginger) would be good.  Have you watched some of the documentaries on Netflix - like "Fat Sick and Nearly Dead" or "Food for Change"?  It just might trigger something and maybe he would make a change for himself.  It hasn't worked for my husband, but maybe it would for work for your partner.  The doctor we see now, told us to stop eating wheat (gluten) and dairy products.  That has helped us lose weight and with time, should help with our cholesterol.

Occasional Visitor
mydearlupe
Total Posts: 13
Registered on: ‎04-10-2013

Re: Lipitor and TYPE 2 Diabetes

Try giving him the Black Corhos Vitamin it prevents sweet cravings if you use it for two weeks it will completely stop cravings.
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phx1967
Total Posts: 3
Registered on: ‎04-04-2013

Re: Lipitor and TYPE 2 Diabetes

thank you, i am going to try everything you advised.  I appreciate your time.

Nelsen Jay
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phx1967
Total Posts: 3
Registered on: ‎04-04-2013

Re: Lipitor and TYPE 2 Diabetes

thank you so much, I am going to try everything you advised. I appreciate your time.

Nelsen Jay
Occasional Visitor
4oceangirl4
Total Posts: 1
Registered on: ‎05-30-2013

Re: Lipitor and TYPE 2 Diabetes

Please google Actos and Januvia. There are thousands of lawsuits in progress from diabetes patients who took Actos and now have bladder cancer. Statistics show that there is a 40% increase in the chance of getting bladder cancer from taking Actos. I know, because my mother is a diabetic who took Actos and now has bladder cancer. I've read a little about Januvia, but enough to know I wouldn't take it if my doctor prescribed it. There are some reports of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer associated with Januvia.

 

A lot of doctors are no longer prescribing Actos. My mother takes Metformin, which is cheaper than Actos. Perhaps your partner could ask his doctor about trying that. It's been on the market for over 20 years and I haven't read anything negative about it.

 

Wishing your partner continued health.

New Member
bbrbbailey
Total Posts: 1
Registered on: ‎06-04-2013

Re: Lipitor and TYPE 2 Diabetes

I am curious as to why you would think his doctor is responsible for this unfortunate happenstance.?  Would you hold the doctor liable if your partner developed a heart attack due to his high cholesterol if it was left untreated?  I don't quite understand this thinking of holding the doctor responsible for a potential unknown side effect of a proven medication, especially when he/she is following current guidelines. This type of thinking contributes to the high cost of medicine, due to increase malpractice cost and physicians ordering unwarranted tests to protect themselves from the always prevalent litigious society in which we live.

 

Anyway if your partner has diabetes, is he/she at a normal body weight?  Is he/she following a low carbohydrate diet and moderately exercising daily.  These are the main treatment guidelines for a patient with type two diabetes.  I can almost guarantee that if a person with diabetes exercises daily, keeps their BMI at a normal to low range, and watches their diet with low simple sugars and carbohydrates, most (not all of course) individuals can bring their blood sugars under some semblance of control.

 

Glucophage (metformin) is a good starting medication as it can be titrated up, however, people with kidney disease cannot take it.  Most diabetic medications are fraught with side effects and contraindications.  Rarely does a person maintain on one medication.  Hence, the more medications, the more potential for side effects. 

 

Lastly, interestingly enough, if you have diabetes, current guidelines suggest that you be put on a statin (i.e. lipitor, zocor, crestor, etc) as diabetes carries has very significant cardiovascular morbidity.