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Frequent Advisor
stansilb
Total Posts: 200
Registered on: ‎04-09-2012

Using whole wheat flour.....

I have read it is better to use whole wheat flour in recipes (for diabetics).  Is it because of the fiber content?

 

I am getting ready for the holiday baking season and am trying to make some recipes as 'diabetic friendly' as possible....although I know they will still probably be higher carb...  This will be my first year working with low carb desserts (for my husband and daughter).

 

I have also read it has a different taste, so you usually only replace some of the reg. flour with whole wheat.  I am thinking if it is just the fiber content, could I just add a little ground flaxseed??  Would that work out about the same?  I know I have used it in a few recipes and it gave it a nice, nutty flavor(well, to me it did anyway).

 

I'm looking at doing that(either whole wheat or flaxseed) and using sweetner instead of sugar, or at least reduced sugar...  Whatever I can get away with and still have it taste good!

 

Any suggestions would be appreciated!

Daughter(age 11)/normal weight/no meds
Diagnosed as Type 2 in April 2012.
Negative for MODY(1, 2, 3) further testing regarding genetics pending
A1cs--4/12~~7.7, 8/12~~5.3, 12/12~~5.7

Husband(43)--Officially diagnosed early 2012(but has had much longer we're sure)
Metformin 500mg/twice daily
A1cs this year--8.3, 6.1, 6.3
alan_s
Total Posts: 14,745
Topics: 207
High Fives: 1,485
Solutions: 167
Registered on: ‎10-30-2009

Re: Using whole wheat flour.....

[ Edited ]

stansilb wrote:

I have read it is better to use whole wheat flour in recipes (for diabetics).  Is it because of the fiber content?

 

I am getting ready for the holiday baking season and am trying to make some recipes as 'diabetic friendly' as possible....although I know they will still probably be higher carb...  This will be my first year working with low carb desserts (for my husband and daughter).

 

I have also read it has a different taste, so you usually only replace some of the reg. flour with whole wheat.  I am thinking if it is just the fiber content, could I just add a little ground flaxseed??  Would that work out about the same?  I know I have used it in a few recipes and it gave it a nice, nutty flavor(well, to me it did anyway).

 

I'm looking at doing that(either whole wheat or flaxseed) and using sweetner instead of sugar, or at least reduced sugar...  Whatever I can get away with and still have it taste good!

 

Any suggestions would be appreciated!


 

There are many reasons for the choices we make for foods, but for type 2s there are two primary ones: blood glucose effects and good nutrition.


For myself, I select using blood glucose effects as the first priority, then within the acceptable choices I select for good nutrition.

 

I have found that wheat flour spikes my blood glucose in regular portion sizes to unacceptable levels. That applies whether the flour is bleached white, wholemeal, multigrain or any other form. The size and speed of the peak may vary slightly but I still go too darn high. Thus I limit my portion sizes as I mentioned in another reply today regardless of the colour or content of the wheat bread.

 

Within that portion size limit I select based on nutrition value. If I have to limit a food source, I try to ensure I get the best value from that limited portion. That is why I select a multigrain wholemeal bread for the few slices I eat.

 

I found that, for myself, the same applies to other forms of starch. Thus I eat very little rice, but the rice I choose is brown etc.

 

I still use a little white flour in recipes, but usually only as a thickener and then, where possible, I use guar gum instead.

Cheers, Alan, Type 2, d&e metformin 2000mg, Australia.
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
There is nothing I could eat I like more than my eyes.
Type 2 Diabetes - A Personal Journey (latest: It Must Be OK - It's Sugar-Free! Wrong!)
Born Under a Wandering Star (Latest: Budapest, Hungary)
Frequent Advisor
stansilb
Total Posts: 200
Registered on: ‎04-09-2012

Re: Using whole wheat flour.....

Thanks for the reply.  I know that they will have to limit the portions anyway, no matter how I modify my baking recipes.  My husband is probably about the same as you--any wheat and he goes way too high.  My daughter seems to be able to tolerate it a bit better(for now anyway).  She is really good at limiting portions and timing any special treats--eating a meal and waiting  a couple of hours, having a special treat, waiting before eating again.

 

Just wondering if I modify the recipes and add whole wheat and/or fiber if it will slow down the spike or make it not as high...  My husband may only get to have a bite, my daughter might be able to have a small slice....  But I know the true test will be the meter...

 

Maybe I can do a regular batch and a modified batch and have my daughter test after each one.  I'm sure she won't object, since it means she gets to have some goodies.  :smileyhappy:  I know I can get her to test, my husband is a different story.....

Daughter(age 11)/normal weight/no meds
Diagnosed as Type 2 in April 2012.
Negative for MODY(1, 2, 3) further testing regarding genetics pending
A1cs--4/12~~7.7, 8/12~~5.3, 12/12~~5.7

Husband(43)--Officially diagnosed early 2012(but has had much longer we're sure)
Metformin 500mg/twice daily
A1cs this year--8.3, 6.1, 6.3
mollythed
Total Posts: 5,792
Topics: 75
High Fives: 996
Solutions: 111
Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

Re: Using whole wheat flour.....

The big difference between whole grain wheat flour and white flour is that whole grain flour includes the outer covering (bran) and the wheat germ while the white flour just contains the inside part of each kernel.  As a result, whole wheat has more fiber, more protein, and since the fiber takes up space but provides no food energy, somewhat fewer calories and somewhat fewer carbs. Those are the reasons it is suggested for people with diabetes.  Obvously, it is still mostly carbs.

 

You can buy 100% whole wheat bread, but often bread will be made from a mix of half whole wheat and half white flour. The extra fiber gives whole wheat a more crumbly, less elastic texture, so with bread, people often add vital wheat gluten to make the dough more elastic.

 

Even when white flour is enriched, it still has fewer nutrients than whole wheat.  I took these numbers from https://www.supertracker.usda.gov/default.aspx which allow us to compare foods side by side.  The numbers are as given for a cup of flour, weighing 125g, although I rearranged the columns a little to fit the board better:

 

  Flour, whole wheat Flour, white 
Nutrient Amount Amount
Total Calories 407 455
Protein 16 g 13 g
Carbohydrate 87 g 95 g
Dietary Fiber 15 g 3 g
Total Fat 2 g 1 g
Saturated Fat 0 g 0 g
Monounsaturated Fat  0 g 0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1 g 1 g
Linoleic Acid 1 g 0 g
α-Linolenic Acid 0.0 g 0.0 g
Omega 3 - EPA 0 mg 0 mg
Omega 3 - DHA 0 mg 0 mg
Cholesterol 0 mg 0 mg
Minerals    
Calcium 41 mg 19 mg
Potassium 486 mg 134 mg
Sodium** 6 mg 3 mg
Copper 458 µg 180 µg
Iron 5 mg 6 mg
Magnesium 166 mg 28 mg
Phosphorus 415 mg 135 mg
Selenium 85 µg 42 µg
Zinc 4 mg 1 mg
Vitamins    
Vitamin A 0 µg RAE 0 µg RAE
Vitamin B6 0.4 mg 0.1 mg
Vitamin B12 0.0 µg 0.0 µg
Vitamin C 0 mg 0 mg
Vitamin D 0 µg 0 µg
Vitamin E 1 mg AT 0 mg AT
Vitamin K 2 µg 0 µg
Folate 53 µg DFE 364 µg DFE
Thiamin 0.5 mg 1.0 mg
Riboflavin 0.3 mg 0.6 mg
Niacin 8 mg 7 mg
Choline 37 mg 13 mg

"Molly" (aka mollythed)
Type 2 diabetes diagnosed in 1995, now managed with Lantus, Humalog and Metformin; diet and exercise.
My husband and three adult sons also have type 2 diabetes.





Occasional Responder
sedotakj
Total Posts: 13
Registered on: ‎09-25-2012

Re: Using whole wheat flour.....

Aside from the  nutrition benefits of Whole Wheat (WW) flour there are a couple of things to note. As noted by others it is a little different to work with. Most bread recipes will include a 50/50 mix of white and WW flour although there are 100% WW recipes out there. I don't really care for these. They usually come out drier than I like. Instead I've started using Multigrain recipes where there is a roughly 50/50 mix PLUS a large component to other grains. Although you can purchase a multi grain mix I generally create my own of corn meal, rye flour, millet, flax seeds, oat bran and perhaps sunflower seeds.

 

I can also use a 75%WW/25%AP flour mix in things like muffins but it will take at least 50% more liquid than standard recipes. Here's a recipe I've been using with some success:

 

1 1/2 C King Arthur stone ground whole wheat flour

1/2 C All purpose flour

1/4 tsp salt

1 TBSP Baking powder

1/2 C Truvia Baking blend (or 1 C regular sugar)

1/2 C Shortening (Crisco works for me but I've also used butter)

1 1/2 Bananas

2 eggs

1 tsp Vanilla extract

3/4 C Buttermilk + more to make batter smooth

1/4 C Golden Raisins (optional)

 

Cream Shortening and sugar

Mash Banana into shortening blend.

Add Vanilla and Eggs and blend till smooth.

Sift flours, baking powder, and salt

Added sifted flour mixture to shortening mixture. Resulting mixture will be dry. DO NOT OVER mix here. That would result in  tough muffins.

Add Buttermilk and incorporate. You will need at least 3/4 of a cup but add a tablespoon or so at a time until the batter is smooth.

Add Raisins if using.

Divide into baking cups.

 

Makes 12 Muffins

Bake in 400 F degree oven for about 20 minutes.

 

There is also a fairly new option available. King Arthur now has a white whole wheat flour. I'm not sure of all the details but I understand that it is made of a different strain of wheat the yields a lighter flour. In practice (mine anyway) it does look lighter but when you add the liquid it will turn darker but not quite as dark as regular WW flour. I've made pasta with this and its great. It has a little more bite and slightly nuttier flavor than regular pasta but not as much as WW Pasta I get at the store.

 

Hope you find this helpful.

Advisor
Dragonstar
Total Posts: 1,061
Registered on: ‎11-01-2009

Re: Using whole wheat flour.....

I have a mix I use containing whole wheat, almond meal and soy flour all mixed together.  I keep it in a container in the frig for freshness.  When I make my bread, pizza dough or whatever, I use it half and half with white flour and 2 tablespoons of wheat bran thrown in.  This seems to come out to about half the carbs of regular mix so my daughter can eat it and not have a large a spike as she would normally with regular store bought bread.  I also have some flax meal in the shelf I haven't been able to fit in the container yet, but it's down enough now I should be able to.   This will drop the carb count even lower and raise the fiber again. 

 

We just don't eat alot of bread items in our house so I don't do much cooking with this mix.  But, the kid's found some recipes online for Baozi, a asian steamed bun I had enjoyed years ago when I worked for a Korean family, so we're going to try to make some one of these days.  Fun!  :smileyvery-happy:


Mother of Courtney, Dx'd Type 1 in 2006 at age 14.

Self: Dx'd "Pre"-Diabetic 8/8/14 *and we all know what that means*
Occasional Responder
sedotakj
Total Posts: 13
Registered on: ‎09-25-2012

Re: Using whole wheat flour.....

Just a note for those who haven't had much experience with it.

You should always keep whole wheat flour in the refridgerator. It has more oils in it than All Purpose flour and it will go ransid faster. When I was in culinary school we kept it in the coolers.