Reply
Frequent Responder
muffnette
Total Posts: 219
Registered on: ‎11-04-2009

thoughts on basmati rice?

ok... so i know most rice is bad for us anyway - but there are times i just want to have some - and i just cannot get myself to like brown rice which i know is better for us over white... however i read that basmati has a lower glycemic index as well so i tried it tonight for dinner - WOW do i like this rice!!! yummy! I am waiting to test myself to see how i react to it but at least its good!

i just wonder if anyone else eats it as the "only rice" we can eat... lol again i get for most of us ANY rice is bad no matter what - but one has to be at least 'somewhat" better than another right?
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~ Karen ~

Diagnosed Type 2 Jan.'02
Last A1C 6.2% on 02/13
Metformin 2000/mg, Glimepiride 8/mg
Actos 30mg, Lisinopril 20/mg, baby aspirin 81/mg
Levothyroxin 137/mcg for Hypothyroidism
Yasmin for PCOS, have retinopathy
Lumigan for Glaucoma
Contributor
jbronste
Total Posts: 428
Registered on: ‎01-13-2010

thoughts on basmati rice?

Why does it have to be somewhat better? Are twinkies somewhat better for you than ho-hos?

All rice spikes me.
Contributor
Austruck
Total Posts: 206
Registered on: ‎01-14-2010

thoughts on basmati rice?

To be fair, though, Jamie, I've read elsewhere on these boards that, when we DO have carbs, it's better for us to have healthier carbs (whole grains versus Ho-Ho's, for instance).

I'd imagine that basmati rice would be at least marginally better *nutritionally* than white rice. Whether or not it spikes any given person's BG is an individual matter.
Frequent Responder
savgigi
Total Posts: 528
Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

thoughts on basmati rice?

Whether you eat any rice depends on whether it spikes you. If you test it a couple of times at your peak and you are within your acceptable range, then go for it. If you don't test well, you'll need to rethink if the rice is worth it.
Jeanie

I want to dance at my grandchildren's weddings. I want to live well and die peacefully in my sleep at the age of 110

T2; Dx 2/2009
Initial A1c 5.7; Current A1c 5.6
Metformin 500mg twice a day
Valued Contributor
maplesyrup
Total Posts: 4,364
Registered on: ‎11-14-2009

thoughts on basmati rice?

I'd imagine that basmati rice would be at least marginally better *nutritionally* than white rice. Whether or not it spikes any given person's BG is an individual matter.


Muffnette, I don't believe it has any more nutritional value that ordinary white rice.

But it really does taste better and most brands I have bought have a lovely scent when cooking.

But alas, I spike with the tiniest bit of rice. To me the way less than � cup I can eat is just a tease so I don't eat rice anymore.

If you can eat an amount that satisfies you without spiking your blood sugar you go for it!

Dianne
Dianne

Diagnosed as type 2 in 2005 with an A1c of 9.1

Started with metformin and a low dose of an ARB for blood pressure. Added a sulfonylurea (a med that helps my pancreas produce my own insulin) Also a low dose of Crestor to lower my cholesterol.
After 7 years I could no longer tolerate metformin so am doing my best to keep control with a max dose of the sulfonylurea and lots of walking, some swimming.
Trusted Contributor
morrisolder
Total Posts: 10,633
Registered on: ‎11-28-2009

thoughts on basmati rice?

There is white basmati rice and brown basmati rice.

The rice I have had for the last year or two is brown masmati. It is slightly lower in carbs than regular brown rice, (based on comparing Lundberg brand labels) and whole grain so higher in fiber than white basmati.

I generally have about a half cup in a meal. Combined with protein (tonight leftover chicken, tofu and aparagus with black bean sauce) and a big green salad it doesn't seem to spike me much at all. 93 to 106 at 1 hour tonight, 89 to 91 at about 3 hours a couple of nights ago.

To be fair, I would probably be about the same with brown rice.

One tip on rice, which also goes for other grains, such as pasta and oats, is that I undercook them a bit. So rice is supposed be boiled with 2-3X the volume of water compared to rice--I use about 1 3/4 cup water with 1 cup rice. With oats ( no I don;t ever have oats, though) or pasta, cooking for a shorter time does the same thing. The complex carbs stay a bit more complex and your body does not digest them quite as quickly . In essence you can lower the glycemic index somewhat. And the taste is less mushy, more texture. Actually same is true for potatoes as well...

Morris

Diagnosed Type 2, with an A1c of 11.4 in 2003; averaging a 5.0 A1c since then with diet, exercise and Glipizide XL + meds for blood pressure and cholesterol. 
A bit dated, but scroll down on this page if you want to know more ...


Contributor
chicagojen
Total Posts: 84
Registered on: ‎02-04-2010

thoughts on basmati rice?

I love rice. Oh, but rice doesn't love me. It's nice to see I'm not the only one who can't handle it one bit. I guess misery loves company. I personally love jasmine rice.

Wondering though....I've heard that if you wash the rice well, it helps with reducing carb content? I know that I've washed it my whole life.....but recall reading that the white stuff that I've been washing is added starch? True? Totally recalling this from memory incorrectly? Totally made this up to try and feel better about indulging in rice once in awhile?

Trusted Contributor
morrisolder
Total Posts: 10,633
Registered on: ‎11-28-2009

thoughts on basmati rice?

I just looked that up--here is what Aki's kitchen has to say:

"ven the best rice can benefit from being washed. To obtain a finished rice that doesn't clump, try soaking the rice in water to remove its excess starch, before cooking it. It's this starch that makes the cooked rice clump. Place rice in a large measuring cup to soak with enough water to cover. Allow the rice to soak until your pot of water has come to a boil: stir frequently.

Rice added to clean water and allowed to soak. (Picture)

When the water has come to a boil, simply strain the rice in a sieve. Rinse rice under cold running water to remove excess starch. You should notice that the water flowing under the sieve turn from a cloudy to a clear flow.

Gently tap sieve to remove excess water and transfer rice to boiling water. Proceed with your recipe

Rice having soaked for about 3 - 6 minutes. (Water has turned cloudy.)"

Seems to be common Asian advice, which could lower carb content, but not everyone agrees, however.

"Is washing rice necessary?

Posted by Swati S.

"While it used to be a good idea to wash rice to make it clean of any dust and dirt, I found out that rice is also supplemented with nutrients like vitamins, minerals, and iron (apparently they take rice, clean it, and then spray it to add the vitamins and minerals.) So washing rice probably leads to a loss of these nutrients. However, I prefer to wash rice because it helps to lose some of the starch, and that lowers the calorie intake. I guess both the ways are right, depending on what you want out of the rice."

My guess is that would apply to inorganic, white rice mainly...

Google "washing rice" for more reads on this...
Morris

Diagnosed Type 2, with an A1c of 11.4 in 2003; averaging a 5.0 A1c since then with diet, exercise and Glipizide XL + meds for blood pressure and cholesterol. 
A bit dated, but scroll down on this page if you want to know more ...


(anon)
Total Posts: 0

thoughts on basmati rice?

Admittedly, I went looking for a web page that would say what I already believed, that rice should not be washed.

The site I found was IndianCurry.com, hence the references to India:


Should I wash rice before cooking?

As a rule wash the rice milled in India and don't wash the rice milled in USA


Rice Processed in USA

During milling and polishing, most of the nutrients are lost. Therefore, almost all the rice processed in United States is fortified with Vitamins, and minerals (Including iron). When you open the package, you see this fortification in the form of a powdery substance. If you wash the rice, you will be washing away the added nutrients.

You may still want to pre-soak rice in a limited amount of water to increase heat conductivity of the grain to reduce cooking time. For this purpose, use � cups of plain water for each cup of rice.


Rice Imported from India

The rice imported from India is not fortified with any nutrients. The powdery stuff you see is the starchy residue after milling and polishing. You should wash and rinse this rice. The starchy residue will make the rice to stick together, and even cause boil over. You should wash and rinse about three times before cooking to get rid of the residue. After washing, the rice should be presoaked to increase thermal conductivity. Use 1� cups of plain water for each cup of raw rice.


What I was looking for was the part about the powdery substance in rice being the added vitamins and minerals that should not be washed off. I guess the answer is to look at the label, and not wash rice that has been fortified.
Long Lost Member
oro4gold@yahoo.com
Total Posts: 13
Registered on: ‎02-08-2010

thoughts on basmati rice?

I agree with your quote I want to see and cuddle my grandchildren with all parts intact.