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texastrish
Total Posts: 123
Registered on: ‎12-05-2009

Tumeric/curcumin for Neuropathy

I was actually looking up tumeric for depression for someone, and this acticle (about 1/2 way down the article) mentioned neuropathy. Has anyone tried tumeric for neuropathy?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2929771/

 

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morrisolder
Total Posts: 10,543
Registered on: ‎11-28-2009

Re: Tumeric/curcumin for Neuropathy

Nobody here has ever mentioned that they did or that it worked for them.

 

If you try it, let us know what you find out...

Morris

Diagnosed Type 2, with an A1c of 11.4 in 2003; averaging a 5.0 A1c since then with diet, exercise and Glipizide XL + meds for blood pressure and cholesterol. 
A bit dated, but scroll down on this page if you want to know more ...


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deafmack
Total Posts: 2,527
Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

Re: Tumeric/curcumin for Neuropathy

That is very interesting reading. I do know that is some cultures Tumeric/Curcumin are used as spices ie India. It will be interesting to see what

further testing is done and if it actually comes to fruition. At the same time they did stress that keeping blood sugars at or near normal levels is

the best way to avoid neuropathic pain, etc.

a Deaf person with Diabetes.

alan_s
Total Posts: 15,010
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Registered on: ‎10-30-2009

Re: Tumeric/curcumin for Neuropathy

[ Edited ]

texastrish wrote:

I was actually looking up tumeric for depression for someone, and this acticle (about 1/2 way down the article) mentioned neuropathy. Has anyone tried tumeric for neuropathy?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2929771/

 


It is an interesting discussion paper. I must admit that I place a little less weight on papers originating in the sub-continent, especially when it relates to spices and herbs. As one example, with one or two exceptions the various papers supporting cinnamon for diabetes all originate in that region. One of the things missing from most of that region's papers is an acknowledgement of funding sources. I also noted that nearly every reference cited is research on rodents, not humans.

 

Having said that, I include turmeric and several other spices as a matter of course in my daily cooking whenever I can. Of 21 main meals per week that spice would appear in at least seven. Additionally, I always add grated black pepper to the turmeric whenever I use it. I came across this paper some years ago:

 

Influence of Piperine on the Pharmacokinetics of Curcumin in Animals and Human Volunteers

Abstract

 

The medicinal properties of curcumin obtained from Curcuma longa L. cannot be utilised because of poor bioavailability due to its rapid metabolism in the liver and intestinal wall. In this study, the effect of combining piperine, a known inhibitor of hepatic and intestinal glucuronidation, was evaluated on the bioavailability of curcumin in rats and healthy human volunteers. When curcumin was given alone, in the dose 2 g/kg to rats, moderate serum concentrations were achieved over a period of 4 h. Concomitant administration of piperine 20 mg/kg increased the serum concentration of curcumin for a short period of 1-2h post drug. Time to maximum was significantly increased (P<0.02) while elimination half life and clearance significantly decreased (P<0.02), and the bioavailability was increased by 154%. On the other hand in humans after a dose of 2g curcumin alone, serum levels were either undetectable or very low. Concomitant administration of piperine 20 mg produced much higher concentrations from 0.25 to 1h post drug (P<0.01 at 0.25 and 0.5h; P < 0.001 at 1 h), the increase in bioavailability was 2000%. The study shows that in the dosages used, piperine enhances the serum concentration, extent of absorption and bioavailability of curcumin in both rats and humans with no adverse effects.

 

I read a different paper which indicated that the dosage level of turmeric is almost irrelevant as long as some, even a sprinkle, is ingested regularly.

 

I added turmeric to my menu many years back because of papers (I'll try to find both papers again) on my cancer email list which showed benefits for cancer, not diabetes. Whether it works, who can say, but I'll know in a couple of weeks at my annual visit to the haemotologist if my CLL is still in remission.

Cheers, Alan, Type 2, d&e metformin 2000mg, Australia.
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
There is nothing I could eat I like more than my eyes.
Type 2 Diabetes - A Personal Journey(latest: Catering For Different Tastes When Cooking)
Born Under a Wandering Star (Latest: Budapest, Hungary)
Frequent Responder
texastrish
Total Posts: 123
Registered on: ‎12-05-2009

Re: Tumeric/curcumin for Neuropathy

Interesting. Thanks. I haven't had time to do any actual reseach since I came across the article, but hope to some time to research it eventually.

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alkay
Total Posts: 7
Registered on: ‎11-08-2013

Re: Tumeric/curcumin for Neuropathy

Tumeric is used all over by many I swear by it and so does my husband basically it decreases inflammation so it can be used in arthritis which I use for my knee stooomach problems which my husband uses it for we haven't had any side affects Iam type one and have a complcation called diabetic gastroparesis caused by neuropathy