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Contributor
chrisptown
Total Posts: 14
Registered on: ‎10-22-2012

Question about Neuropathy and Red Pinky Toes

First let me say that my A1C was terrible last month, 8.5 and have been having numbness in my toes for about a year now.  As much as I try to stop eating things I shouldn't I then go and do it.  My question is have any of you ever had your pinky toe get pink or reddish?  Both mine are not the same tan color as the other four toes on each foot.  I keep thinking that it means those pinky toes are going to turn black and then have to be amputated.  Is there any advice anyone can give me?  I know the neuropathy is my fault and I want to stop it from getting worse.  Thank you.

Super Advisor
jpg391
Total Posts: 6,015
Registered on: ‎05-22-2011

Re: Question about Neuropathy and Red Pinky Toes


chrisptown wrote:

First let me say that my A1C was terrible last month, 8.5 and have been having numbness in my toes for about a year now.  As much as I try to stop eating things I shouldn't I then go and do it.  My question is have any of you ever had your pinky toe get pink or reddish?  Both mine are not the same tan color as the other four toes on each foot.  I keep thinking that it means those pinky toes are going to turn black and then have to be amputated.  Is there any advice anyone can give me?  I know the neuropathy is my fault and I want to stop it from getting worse.  Thank you.


I am not a doctor and have never had this happen to me. since this is happening to both pinky toes, the only thing that comes to mind is this, that your shoes do not have a big enough toe box for your feet. As diabetics we need to be sure that our shoes fit really good. Do you have a podiatrist that you can talk to? The other thing is to see your regular doctor about it.

James G

I'm just a guy who has had type 2 diabetes for 30+ years.

"It is common sense to take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something." – Franklin D. Roosevelt

"When you get to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on." – Franklin D. Roosevelt

"I always wondered why somebody doesn't do something about that. Then I realized I was somebody." – Lily Tomlin

"Happiness is a state of mind." - Walt Disney

On 9/5/14 had amputation of my right leg, below the knee.

Latest A1C 5.3 on 12/3/14

Lipids test on 8/22/13
Total Cholesterol 132
HDL Cholesterol 45
LDL Cholesterol 68
Triglycerides 94

Medications
2,000mgs X2 a day (2 weeks taking then 1 week not taking, then start over again) Capecirabine for Recital Cancer after surgery (not being taken at this time).
10mg Simvastain for Cholesterol.
500mg Metformin twice a day
10 units Levemir, a long lasting insulin
81mg Asprin once a day
40mg of Quinapril (also known as Accupril) twice a day for HBP (to be taken only if BP is over 120).
20mg of Lexapro once a day for depression
1mg of Doxazosin once a day at bed time for a Prostate problem
30mg of Buspirone twice a day for Anxiety
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George_M
Total Posts: 2,233
Registered on: ‎11-16-2012

Re: Question about Neuropathy and Red Pinky Toes


chrisptown wrote:

First let me say that my A1C was terrible last month, 8.5 and have been having numbness in my toes for about a year now.  As much as I try to stop eating things I shouldn't I then go and do it.  My question is have any of you ever had your pinky toe get pink or reddish?  Both mine are not the same tan color as the other four toes on each foot.  I keep thinking that it means those pinky toes are going to turn black and then have to be amputated.  Is there any advice anyone can give me?  I know the neuropathy is my fault and I want to stop it from getting worse.  Thank you.


Hi, chrisptown.  First, I don't know if what is happening to your pinky toes is neuropathy or not.  I would advise seeing a doctor about that.  Second, I believe that if you do not get your A1C down, you will have problems with diabetic complications in the future, whether or not the pinky toe problem is neuropathy or not.  You have to get that A1C under control one way or another.  There are 4 ways to reduce blood glucose that I know of:

  1. Diet - specifically a low carb diet.  You say you try to stop eating things you shouldn't and then you go and do it.  Do you have these things in the house?  Do you live with other family members and have these things for them?  I find that I can resist some things, others are harder, so I just don't have those hard things around.
  2. Exercise.  Regular exercise will reduce our blood glucose.  I try to exercise for an hour each day, to the point where I break a sweat and breathe so deeply that regular conversation is difficult.
  3. Weight loss, for those of us who have a Body Mass Index above 25, can reduce our blood glucose.
  4. Medication.

If you are unable to do any of the first three on that list, depression could be a problem, and you should ask your doctor for an evaluation for depression.  Depression is very common for us, but it is often successfully treated.  Until it is treated, it keeps us from doing what we need to do to care for ourselves.

 

If nothing else works, your doctor should be changing your medications or dosages to bring that A1C down.  In the end, it is much more important that it comes down than how it comes down.

 

If you care to post any details about diet and diet problems, exercise, and weight, we can provide specific tips that have worked for us that you could try.  It is great that you are concerned.  It is time to translate that concern into actions that will improve the situation.  We will help you find the actions that will work for you.

George

Diagnosed T2 9/12/12, A1C 10.1
Metformin 500 mg. 1 x daily since 9/17/2012
A1C 12/13/2012 5.6
A1C 3/15/2013 5.4
A1C 11/29/2013 5.5
Weight at diagnosis 9/12/2012 288
Weight 10/01/2013 187
Super Advisor
strollingbonez
Total Posts: 705
Registered on: ‎12-17-2012

Re: Question about Neuropathy and Red Pinky Toes

The foot doctor who spoke at the diabetics class...said most diabetics wear shoes 2 sizes too small...due to numbness in the feet...i got my mom the diabetic shoes for walking...she was having trouble with her pinky toe being rubbed and was wearing pad....we left the doctors office and went and got her a size larger shoe...she wears an 11 now....

the different colored toes would scare me....

Trusted Contributor
maryd98
Total Posts: 6,203
Registered on: ‎08-07-2012

Re: Question about Neuropathy and Red Pinky Toes


chrisptown wrote:

First let me say that my A1C was terrible last month, 8.5 and have been having numbness in my toes for about a year now.  As much as I try to stop eating things I shouldn't I then go and do it.  My question is have any of you ever had your pinky toe get pink or reddish?  Both mine are not the same tan color as the other four toes on each foot.  I keep thinking that it means those pinky toes are going to turn black and then have to be amputated.  Is there any advice anyone can give me?  I know the neuropathy is my fault and I want to stop it from getting worse.  Thank you.


I think the responses you've gotten so far are very good, Chris.

 

I'd like to add a couple of things:

 

The discolored pinky toes might indeed be due to your shoes being too small. You can go to a good shoe store (I like SAS, personally) and get an accurate measurement. (I haven't personally experienced this as a regular/permanent thing, but my toes have gotten red here and there when I've worn shoes that are tight in one spot or another...I rarely do this, BTW. I like to give my toes plenty of wiggle room!)

 

However, given the numbness that you're experiencing, I would go to a podiatrist first, before buying a pair of shoes and hoping that will take care of the red pinkies. Try to find one that's knowledgeable about diabetes; I think all podiatrists should be, but I have a feeling that's not a safe bet.

 

Good luck! I hope you'll come back with an update.

Till next time,
maryd98
the diabetic formerly known as 14 and counting, aka Mary
-----------------------------------
Diagnosed T2 July 1998
First A1C (July 1998): 13.6
First BG (July 1998): 537
Latest A1C (December 2014): 5.7
On oral meds for about 9 months after diagnosis
"Just" diet and exercise for 15+ years