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Texastrish
Total Posts: 122
Registered on: ‎12-05-2009

Neuropathy and amputation

Does neuropathy (by itself lead to amputation) or is it the result of secondary things, like getting an infected cut on your foot because you didn't feel it? 

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tbrbeast
Total Posts: 145
Registered on: ‎11-02-2009

Re: Neuropathy and amputation

Assume that the it you refer to is amputation.  Not quite sure how to answer this.  I don't thiink neuropathy in and of itself results in an amputation.  My experience is that it is a contributing factor in that a person with it, and not paying attention to their feet, can develop an infection that necessitates an amputation.  My experience tells me that any type of wound - open or closed - has the potential to become infected.  One of the things diabetics are commonly warned about is the potential for wounds to develop beneath callous tissue.  We are told to wear smooth socks, avoid seams in shoes etc.  Even the simple shear stresses that develop between a foot, a sock and the footbed of your shoe can cause a wound (blisters anyone?).  Even when the person knows that there is a wound and is monitoring and atreating it, can be subject to an infection and subsequent amputation.  Been there and done that.  If you have neuropathy, you have to be extra vigilent in monitoring your feet.  When you see a change, a change in color, a wound, anythiing abnormal, go see a doctor ASAP.  One of the advantages of being a diabetic is that doctor knowledgeable about diabetes tend to see patients quickly when conditions indicate.  This is one of those situations where you can't be too hasty; a visit to see the doctor is far cheaper than $25-$50000 or more for an amputation (and that doesn't include the cost of any prosthetics - $1500/pair or more for a partial foot and up to $50,000 or more for some of the more sophisticated legs).  

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LeadSinger
Total Posts: 501
Registered on: ‎12-07-2009

Re: Neuropathy and amputation

Trish, neuropathy is a malfunction of the nerves (usually, but definitely not always) in peripheral areas of the body (most notably feet).  Most common symptom is pain, but it can also be a lack of feeling.   The base cause is usually  nerve damage due to continually high blood sugars (VERY simplified explanation).   It is VERY rarely the cause of amputation. 

Diagnosed T2 on 3/1/2007 with A1c of 13.0
Member of the 5% club for past 3 years
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Spookiesmom
Total Posts: 1,453
Registered on: ‎02-17-2010

Re: Neuropathy and amputation

Listen to trbeast.

He KNOWS what he's talking about!!
Barb T2 Omni Pod since 1-09
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dturney
Total Posts: 1,209
Registered on: ‎04-21-2011

Re: Neuropathy and amputation


texastrish wrote:

Does neuropathy (by itself lead to amputation) or is it the result of secondary things, like getting an infected cut on your foot because you didn't feel it? 


Mayo Clinic..........................

Diabetes complications include nerve damage and poor blood circulation. These problems make the feet vulnerable to skin sores (ulcers) that can worsen quickly and are difficult to treat. Proper diabetes management and careful foot care can help prevent foot ulcers.:smileyhappy:

Diagnosed June 1970 TYPE 2
INSULIN ON DAY ONE AND EVERY DAY AFTER
44 YEAR DIABETIC SURVIVOR
WELL BALANCED DIET
Daughter Diagnosed Type 1 at age 4
Multiple Daily Exogenous Insulin Injections
LANTUS & HUMALOG
500mg Metformin X 3
I am not young enough to know everything.

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George_M
Total Posts: 2,232
Registered on: ‎11-16-2012

Re: Neuropathy and amputation


dturney wrote:

texastrish wrote:

Does neuropathy (by itself lead to amputation) or is it the result of secondary things, like getting an infected cut on your foot because you didn't feel it? 


Mayo Clinic..........................

Diabetes complications include nerve damage and poor blood circulation. These problems make the feet vulnerable to skin sores (ulcers) that can worsen quickly and are difficult to treat. Proper diabetes management and careful foot care can help prevent foot ulcers.:smileyhappy:


As noted, diabetes can include poor blood circulation.  If blood circulation becomes poor enough, it can result in amputation, and this is normally the reason why non-diabetics get foot amputations.  But I think it is a long, long ways between a tingling in your toes and that. 

George

Diagnosed T2 9/12/12, A1C 10.1
Metformin 500 mg. 1 x daily since 9/17/2012
A1C 12/13/2012 5.6
A1C 3/15/2013 5.4
A1C 11/29/2013 5.5
Weight at diagnosis 9/12/2012 288
Weight 10/01/2013 187