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Advisor
Dewski2000
Total Posts: 156
Registered on: ‎07-02-2011

Hyper vs. Hypo...

The ADA website defines hypoglycemia as: hypoglycemia (hy-po-gly-SEE-mee-uh)
a condition that occurs when one's blood glucose is lower than normal, usually less than 70 mg/dL.

But hyperglycemia isn't defined with a blood glucose level.  Is there a reason for this?  
Is there a "standard" for hyperglycemia??

Also, I read in another message board on this sight, of a person who ate a double-meat hamburger, fries, and a Sprite and was concerned that there sugar went up 30 points directly after the meal.  

Earlier this month, when Syracuse, NY hit 101 degrees, I cracked and got a medium Burger King strawberry shake.  My sugar went up to 240.  The reason that I say this is (and I've said this before in other posts), is that I feel any different at all when I have a strange reading.  I have been as high as 369 and as low as 79 since I was diagnosed.  

99% of the time I behave.    My readings have been averaging about 125 in the morning when I wake up and mid to high 100s throughout the day.  (I even had some Ben & Jerry's a few nights ago and my sugar was fine! - 142 before I went to bed).  Is it possible that I may have some other thing that may act a bit like diabetes but is something else all together??


Diagnosed: June 22, 2011 GL – 355
A1c:
June 2011 - 13.6
Nov. 2012 - 6.0
Dec. 2013 - 6.9
===============
Metformin HCL ER 1000mg
Januvia 100mg
Invokana 100mg
Other meds for depression, anxiety, cholesterol

Dewski2000
-= Scott =-
Trusted Contributor
morrisolder
Total Posts: 10,455
Registered on: ‎11-28-2009

Hyper vs. Hypo...

The reason why  diabetes is usually not  diagnosed on the basis of a single glucose reading is to rule out alternative explanations--like stress, illness, or prednisone... But your 240, and your 369 are not anything that would happen to anyone who did NOT have diabetes, so no alternative explanation, try as we might.\

That is perceptive that the guy who had the burger, fries and Sprite only rose 30 pts.  Without diabetes, you might expect up to a 40 pt increase from most meals with Sprite and fires and bun. The fat and protein in the burger could have delayed it -as would ice cream, but even so... This person, however, may not have tested at their high point afte the meal, which could have been much higher.

Morris

Diagnosed Type 2, with an A1c of 11.4 in 2003; averaging a 5.0 A1c since then with diet, exercise and Glipizide XL + meds for blood pressure and cholesterol. 
A bit dated, but scroll down on this page if you want to know more ...


lizzylou
Total Posts: 13,915
Topics: 563
High Fives: 1,979
Solutions: 142
Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

Hyper vs. Hypo...

Scott,

We say time after time that YMMV - Your Mileage May Vary.  What happens with one person doesn't define/explain what happens to you.

The person you mentioned was diagnosed with much lower numbers than you, so is most likely not as advanced in the disease as you are.  Many people are being diagnosed earlier these days, before their numbers have a chance to really get as high as those of us in the past.  There are also many people who can't even eat 10 grams of carbs without spiking! 

You simply can't compare yourself to anyone else.  Your body is the way it is for you. 

Lizzy
Knowledge is Power!





Here's some useful links, click on the titles


Testing 101
 
 All About Carbs

Resources For The Un-insured and Discount Medicine and Equipment

LizzyLou Videos



Lizzy's Blog
for lots more  


Advisor
Dewski2000
Total Posts: 156
Registered on: ‎07-02-2011

Hyper vs. Hypo...

The people on these message boards make too damn much sense!!!  LOL!!     Thank you both for putting me in my place...  Hehehe

Diagnosed: June 22, 2011 GL – 355
A1c:
June 2011 - 13.6
Nov. 2012 - 6.0
Dec. 2013 - 6.9
===============
Metformin HCL ER 1000mg
Januvia 100mg
Invokana 100mg
Other meds for depression, anxiety, cholesterol

Dewski2000
-= Scott =-
Advisor
Dewski2000
Total Posts: 156
Registered on: ‎07-02-2011

Hyper vs. Hypo...

Hi morrisolder!!  :-)

The reason why  diabetes is usually not  diagnosed on the basis of a single glucose reading is to rule out alternative explanations--like stress, illness, or prednisone... But your 240, and your 369 are not anything that would happen to anyone who did NOT have diabetes, so no alternative explanation, try as we might.

Well, one of the reasons that I mentioned it was:

A few years ago, my depression became extremely severe.  I had to deal with a few problems that I never had to before.  I was diagnosed with being extremely manic, with bi-polar traits.  I have been taking Seroquel ER, Depakote ER and Hydroxyzine HCL on top of Zoloft ever since.

Come to find out, that people with diabetes most likely should NOT take three out of four of those medications...  Problems can result in your glucose levels, pancreatic issues, and kidney issues.  And interactions with the drug Actos that i was on for about a month has a whole other aspect of a nightmare attached to it.

So, I was hoping to blame much of this on my rather hefty drug regiments, LOL - like you said, try as we might...  ;-)



Diagnosed: June 22, 2011 GL – 355
A1c:
June 2011 - 13.6
Nov. 2012 - 6.0
Dec. 2013 - 6.9
===============
Metformin HCL ER 1000mg
Januvia 100mg
Invokana 100mg
Other meds for depression, anxiety, cholesterol

Dewski2000
-= Scott =-
Long Lost Member
kittydelsilencio
Total Posts: 54
Registered on: ‎08-16-2011

Hyper vs. Hypo...

I, too, am on several of those medications.  I've found in my research that the atypicals {one of them is Seroquel} can cause, or if not cause, exacerbate, insulin resistance.  My blood sugar numbers were normal before going on Seroquel and Risperdal {amonth others}, and they steadily rose afterward.  I won't blame it solely on the medication, as other factors surely affected it.  But I've been told by both my PCP and my Psych that Seroquel and Risperdal undoubtedly played a part in the manifestation of Type 2.

I can't offer any advice on this subject, since not taking them is not an option.  But you are correct in thinking the two are linked. 
2000 mg Metformin ER 1x daily
10 mg Glipizide 1x daily
38 Units Lantus 1x daily

Long Lost Member
kittydelsilencio
Total Posts: 54
Registered on: ‎08-16-2011

Hyper vs. Hypo...

 
2000 mg Metformin ER 1x daily
10 mg Glipizide 1x daily
38 Units Lantus 1x daily

Long Lost Member
kittydelsilencio
Total Posts: 54
Registered on: ‎08-16-2011

Hyper vs. Hypo...

 
2000 mg Metformin ER 1x daily
10 mg Glipizide 1x daily
38 Units Lantus 1x daily

Long Lost Member
kittydelsilencio
Total Posts: 54
Registered on: ‎08-16-2011

Hyper vs. Hypo...

I, too, am on several of those medications.  I've found in my research that the atypicals {one of them is Seroquel} can cause, or if not cause, exacerbate, insulin resistance.  My blood sugar numbers were normal before going on Seroquel and Risperdal {amonth others}, and they steadily rose afterward.  I won't blame it solely on the medication, as other factors surely affected it.  But I've been told by both my PCP and my Psych that Seroquel and Risperdal undoubtedly played a part in the manifestation of Type 2.

I can't offer any advice on this subject, since not taking them is not an option.  But you are correct in thinking the two are linked
2000 mg Metformin ER 1x daily
10 mg Glipizide 1x daily
38 Units Lantus 1x daily

Trusted Contributor
morrisolder
Total Posts: 10,455
Registered on: ‎11-28-2009

Hyper vs. Hypo...

Well for the moment, let's compare those meds with Prednisone, a steroid. Prednisone in small doses over a short period can cause increased blood glucose levels, and then when you stop, they go away after a bit. With larger doses, over a longer period, it can actualy cause diabetes that does not vanish when the Prednisone is discontinued.  And at that point the person has diabetes, and has to treat it as such, even though the cause is unusual.

To some extent with these other meds, the calculus may be similar. If you are  no longer taking them, but still have 240 and 369, then you have diabetes, even if the meds helped you get there.   If you are still taking those meds, then you have to do the usual figuring of comparing benefits vs side effects.  It wouldnt be fair, I don't think, to say that bi-polar, say, is worse than diabetes or vice-versa--surely the dgree to which each manifests has to enter the equation. But if there are other meds that treat the condition without the side effects, then that must be worth considering..

Which I'd bet you figured out a while ago...
Morris

Diagnosed Type 2, with an A1c of 11.4 in 2003; averaging a 5.0 A1c since then with diet, exercise and Glipizide XL + meds for blood pressure and cholesterol. 
A bit dated, but scroll down on this page if you want to know more ...