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rexfishersr
Total Posts: 14
Registered on: ‎01-16-2012

Re: Blood glucose to HbA1c conversion

OK Lizzy, now you are getting personal.  Belly up to the bar and list the rude statements.

Trusted Contributor
morrisolder
Total Posts: 10,640
Registered on: ‎11-28-2009

Re: Blood glucose to HbA1c conversion

The bar?  So now we're going to have a bar brawl?

 

Let's lighten up here a little--it's one thing to seek precise answers and knowledge, quite another to say that people who may not provide enough detail to satisfy you are spouting BS.

 

RE your example on carbs and glycemic index:  as in most things the answer is complex. Bottom line in my book is that the biggest impact on blood sugar comes from the grams of carbs. Glycemic index can make a difference but is flawed as a primary index for two reasons, no matter how many graphs there might be. First is that you almost never eat a single food alone--except maybe fruit. Food is almost always combined with other food, and when you combine crackers with cheese, say, the glycemic index of the crackers is less relevant than the combination with cheese, protein which slows down the absorption of carbs. Second is that GI is derived by averaging the response of 10 people, and average mandat4ed by the fact that there is a range of response for each food. So I might be at the low end of that range, you might be at the high end. The GI might be in the middle, not quite right for either one of us. Which makes an interesting data point to start with, but not a true determining factor unless you can confirm that number with your meter.

 

So that both things are true to varying extent, regardless of the detail with which they are explained...neither is BS... in my book. unless we mean blood sugar...

 

RE your other question, yes, I think you go it-glucose derived from our food (or from our liver) ends up in the blood, most of it bound for our muscles, brain and other organs. Some ends up attaching to hemoglobin.  The more excess there is in the blood, the more attaches to hemoglobin...which is how A1c correlates to blood sugar levels.  And no I am not an endocrinologist or a doctor--just someone who had this for eight years and has tried to learn about it by reading so that I can manage it...

 

 

 

 

Morris

Diagnosed Type 2, with an A1c of 11.4 in 2003; averaging a 5.0 A1c since then with diet, exercise and Glipizide XL + meds for blood pressure and cholesterol. 
A bit dated, but scroll down on this page if you want to know more ...


alan_s
Total Posts: 15,274
Topics: 214
High Fives: 1,672
Solutions: 185
Registered on: ‎10-30-2009

Re: Blood glucose to HbA1c conversion

[ Edited ]

rexfishersr wrote:

Dianne, your wet noodle is lethal!!  Please see that I said "some."  I did not say "all" and I think those of you that are qualified (and there are many that I have conversed with today who are) might do all of us a favor by listing your qualifications briefly as you post.  I don't know what the standards are for reaching a certain title of contributor (super or master or whatever) on this web site, but I have seen some sites where the only criterion is the number of posts someone has made.  Being able to sit at your computer all day and type does not make someone an expert in the area of diabetes.

 

You did not address the example I cited, and I am sorry you were offended.  As I said much earlier today, I am very opinionated, and if you feel that you should accept everything that everyone says simply because they say it, then you certainly have that right.  I, on the hand, will continue to ask "what makes sense?"



 

List our qualifications?

 

I'll show you mine.

 

I am a qualified Engineer and a past member of the Australian Institute of Engineers. I am also many other things, including a retired RAAF Squadron Leader with 20 years of service and a traveller of the world.

 

And none of that means diddly-squat here, mister.

 

The only qualifications required for being on this forum are a desire to learn more about diabetes or to try to assist others with diabetes who need support. Some of us have been here long enough to learn a little about this condition over the years. Some of that we learnt from books, some from scientific papers on the web, some from discussions with many people with diabetes or who treat diabetes.

 

But mostly, like the majority here, I learned from my own body and my meter, treating my body as a science experiment. I, like Lizzy and Morris and many others here, am occasionally gratified to find that the knowledge I pass on seems to help some of those who receive it.

 

Now you show me yours.

Cheers, Alan, Type 2, d&e metformin 2000mg, Australia.
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
There is nothing I could eat I like more than my eyes.
Type 2 Diabetes - A Personal Journey(latest: Catering For Different Tastes When Cooking)
Born Under a Wandering Star (Latest: Budapest, Hungary)
Responder
rexfishersr
Total Posts: 14
Registered on: ‎01-16-2012

Re: Blood glucose to HbA1c conversion

OK Alan.  My qualifications are that I have only proposed situations and asked questions.  Although I just started on this Community today, I was diagnosed almost six and a half years ago.  I have been asking questions all that time, including to the Joslin Center.  I have not offered any advice because I am still not qualified to do so, and I know that.  It doesn't make me feel any less of a man because I don't know the answers.  That's how I learn, by asking questions, wading through the answers and then weeding out the ones that don't make sense.  All you or anyone else has to do is just read through this string and you will see contradiction after contradiction after contradiction from different people answering the same question.  Some answers make no sense at all.  Others make lots of sense.  That's a pretty good test I use.  It has served me well over the years, and I will continue to use it, regardless of your sensitivity.

 

I suggested a brief list of qualifications.  Which post would you read first, one that says "I am a degreed engineer" or one that says "I have written 14,000 posts?"  A person with a high school diploma can effectively answer a question about long division (maybe) but certainly not about brain surgery.  If you weren't so temperamental you would understand that I was not referring to you.  But it appears as though intent, not content, is all that matters to you and others like Dianne and Lizzy.  This will be my last post. I don't need the insolence.  Have a great life.

Frequent Advisor
billsreef
Total Posts: 4,100
Registered on: ‎11-02-2009

Re: Blood glucose to HbA1c conversion


rexfishersr wrote:

Now for billsreef.  Very interesting, especially your comment about affecting osmotic pressure.  Since I have heard that insulin helps "open the gate" so the glucose can enter the cell, I am assuming the increased osmotic pressure is inside the cell keeping the glucose from entering as easily.

 

But that brings to mind the time period surrounding my bypass operation.  I have done heavy doses of cardio exercise for years, even before the heart attack.  In fact the surgeon told me that I had built lots of ancillary arteries around the blockages, and that is why I am alive today.  But if my glucose reading was 454 then those little glucoses couldn't have gotten in the cells with the help of dynamite.  So how was I able to perform the two hours of cardio if my cells weren't getting food?  This is the kind of conflicting data that makes me ask the questions.


While increased BG levels can increases osmotic pressure, it's not osmotic pressure that effects glucose transport across the cell membranes. If it was, our issues with insulin wouldn't effect our BG levels :smileywink: The transport of glucose across cell membranes is active transport that requires insulin to "open the door". BTW, the usual recomendation is to not excercise if your BG is over 300, as you run a high risk of ketoacidosis. Here's a link on the subject of BG levels and excercise from the Mayo Clinic.

 

In regards to credentials, everyone in this thread has the most important ones, the experience of being diabetic, seeking to learn as much as possible, and helping others. Beyond that is pretty irrelevent. Alan is a engineer, not a doctor, yet I've found his advice quite helpful. Not sure what Morris's credentials are, beyond being a helpful diabetic, but I've found him quite helpful as well. Lizzy actually does literature reviews for medical researchers, and is quite a helpful fellow diabetic, No clue about Dianne's credentials, other than she is another very helpful diabetic....I expect you get the idea by now :smileywink:

alan_s
Total Posts: 15,274
Topics: 214
High Fives: 1,672
Solutions: 185
Registered on: ‎10-30-2009

Re: Blood glucose to HbA1c conversion

[ Edited ]


rexfishersr wrote:

OK Alan.  My qualifications are that I have only proposed situations and asked questions.  Although I just started on this Community today, I was diagnosed almost six and a half years ago.  I have been asking questions all that time, including to the Joslin Center.  I have not offered any advice because I am still not qualified to do so, and I know that.  It doesn't make me feel any less of a man because I don't know the answers.  That's how I learn, by asking questions, wading through the answers and then weeding out the ones that don't make sense.  All you or anyone else has to do is just read through this string and you will see contradiction after contradiction after contradiction from different people answering the same question.  Some answers make no sense at all.  Others make lots of sense.  That's a pretty good test I use.  It has served me well over the years, and I will continue to use it, regardless of your sensitivity.

 

I suggested a brief list of qualifications.  Which post would you read first, one that says "I am a degreed engineer" or one that says "I have written 14,000 posts?"  A person with a high school diploma can effectively answer a question about long division (maybe) but certainly not about brain surgery.  If you weren't so temperamental you would understand that I was not referring to you.  But it appears as though intent, not content, is all that matters to you and others like Dianne and Lizzy.  This will be my last post. I don't need the insolence.  Have a great life.



 

Actually, I didn't take it personally, your post was not addressed to me. I simply answered the general suggestion to list our qualifications with a specific answer. It never occurred to me that it may appear temperamental.

 

It seems you have no problem repeatedly mentioning that you are opininated, but a real problem when differing opinions to your own are posed in responses. You may not need the insolence. That's your loss, because you may need the information.

 

And I'm already having a great life; I thought I may as well enjoy this one because I'm not all that certain about reincarnation.

 

PS

Which post would you read first, one that says "I am a degreed engineer" or one that says "I have written 14,000 posts?" 

Neither. If I'm trying to learn how to live longer without diabetes complications I'd read the one from a long term diabetic who has none.

 

If the degreed engineer has an A1c of 11% or the person with 14000 posts has retinopathy and neuropathy and is on dialysis, I couldn't care less about that degree or the number of posts.

Cheers, Alan, Type 2, d&e metformin 2000mg, Australia.
Everything in Moderation - Except Laughter.
There is nothing I could eat I like more than my eyes.
Type 2 Diabetes - A Personal Journey(latest: Catering For Different Tastes When Cooking)
Born Under a Wandering Star (Latest: Budapest, Hungary)
Advisor
kyfroggie
Total Posts: 281
Registered on: ‎11-23-2009

Re: Blood glucose to HbA1c conversion



While increased BG levels can increases osmotic pressure, it's not osmotic pressure that effects glucose transport across the cell membranes. If it was, our issues with insulin wouldn't effect our BG levels :smileywink: The transport of glucose across cell membranes is active transport that requires insulin to "open the door". 

 

Billsreef,

Just curious. I always thought that the transport of glucose across the cell membrane was a form of facilitated diffusion which would be considered passive transport not active. Is it only considered active transport for those with insulin resistance?

 

Carol