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Trusted Contributor
morrisolder
Total Posts: 10,562
Registered on: ‎11-28-2009

Re: A1C two months after diagnosis

Earlier in the thread you asked how much difference the metformin is making after 8 weeks. It might be making some difference at your current, relatively low dosage, and could kick in a bit more over the next month.

 

But the other med, Amaryl, has as big an effect and a lot more quickly. My A1c dropped a similar amount when I started on Glipizide, a drug very similar to Amaryl.  If it is not causing lows, taking it a bit later in the evening might help with the overnight increase in blood glucose levels.  But you'd want to be careful not to have overnight lows...

 

Perhaps more important is to solidify the gains you have already made. Keep learning about different foods,and trying new recipes, keep up and/or increase the exercise and find ways to manage that are more comfortable rather than a challenge. If you can find new good habits that you really like, you are much more likely to stick with them for the long term.

 

And actually if your A1c dropped so much after just 2 months, it wil drop some more, even if nothing changes, the next time.  That's because A1c reflects the last 3 months of glucose levels, and 3 months ago yours were pretty high. Once those old red blood cells disappear, and are replaced by newer ones, your new A1c will more accurately reflect current blood glucose levels.

Morris

Diagnosed Type 2, with an A1c of 11.4 in 2003; averaging a 5.0 A1c since then with diet, exercise and Glipizide XL + meds for blood pressure and cholesterol. 
A bit dated, but scroll down on this page if you want to know more ...


Established Advisor
GraceAlex
Total Posts: 372
Registered on: ‎04-27-2013

Re: A1C two months after diagnosis

Thank you, everyone!  Morris, I'll try bumping the Amaryl to later and see if that makes a diffreence! ((hugs)) to all you great guys and gals. I appreciate the support, encouragement and solid advice.

Frequent Responder
jimssnell
Total Posts: 592
Registered on: ‎09-11-2012

Re: A1C two months after diagnosis


GraceAlex wrote:

Thank you, everyone!  Morris, I'll try bumping the Amaryl to later and see if that makes a diffreence! ((hugs)) to all you great guys and gals. I appreciate the support, encouragement and solid advice.


Grace:

 

Out of curiosity, what do you mean by bumping the amaryl to later.  If you do not mind me asking, what time do you take the drug. I see on the data sheet it has a lasting duration of 24 hours and a 1/2 life of 6 to 9,5 hours. Have you read or looked at the data sheet on this drug on the web.

 

For me, I have only used the earlier version called glyburide. I was amazed at all the precautions and contrindications on the glimepiride drug. Here again, only your Doctor as your safety offficer can really weigh all those aspects and their importance to you.

 

best wishes.

James (Jim) W. Snell
30+ years as type 2 diabetic
40 years as Digital Microprocessor System designer
Stroke in 2007 and retired.
Metformin, Humalog Lispro, 1200 calorie Diet and 1.5 to 2 miles walking exercise A1C = 6.4
http://db2jimcaresta.com
Established Advisor
GraceAlex
Total Posts: 372
Registered on: ‎04-27-2013

Re: A1C two months after diagnosis

Jim, I meant taking it later in the evening as opposed to before the evening meal (after 6 instead of before 6.)

I'm still muddling through the spec sheets trying to understand them. I am NOT a chemistry major! :smileywink:

Frequent Responder
jimssnell
Total Posts: 592
Registered on: ‎09-11-2012

Re: A1C two months after diagnosis

Grace:

 

Neither am I. one thing I have spent time looking for effigy(run) times on pill dose to live time at stable max dose.

 

Today it is virtually very difficult to get easy answers  for that either from data sheets much less one's pharmacist and Doctor.

 

Why that should be so difficult, totally  eludes me. It really is critical but every one says here take this pill, nobody checks its effects initially and time to see actial effectiveness versus time.

 

The amount of disclaimers and exceptions for that amaryl and I assume glyburide really leave one cold.

 

One wonders if all the fear of liquid insulin is really justified or is it just the phsycology of the needles and spy - horror movies!

 

Shoving food and pills in ones mouth is assumed to be totally safe/benighn. Like eating wild mushrooms or Japanese puffer fish.

 

 

James (Jim) W. Snell
30+ years as type 2 diabetic
40 years as Digital Microprocessor System designer
Stroke in 2007 and retired.
Metformin, Humalog Lispro, 1200 calorie Diet and 1.5 to 2 miles walking exercise A1C = 6.4
http://db2jimcaresta.com
Established Advisor
GraceAlex
Total Posts: 372
Registered on: ‎04-27-2013

Re: A1C two months after diagnosis

I always forget you have the insulin for a booster, Jim!  I agree that insulin is nothing to be afraid of, and that a lot of people are probably needle phobic - I know I don't love the idea opf having to self administer shots all the time, especially as my skin gets irritated so easily!

I think that understandiong how each person's body works and what the real issues are should definitely be a factor in what kind of meds are taken. If I am making insulin myself, but am resistant, adding more insulin doesn't solve my problem as effectively as trying to address the resistance problem.... right? I'm still learning and appreciate you taking all the time to read and talk about these issues.