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energeticmom
Total Posts: 479
Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

What is a "normal" A1C?

What is a normal A1C for someone who does not have diabetes? My husband had routine blood work that showed his A1C to be 5.5, and that is textbook "pre-diabetic" (and some Drs. say either you are, or you aren't--none of this "pre" stuff).  I know that many people with Type 2 don't fit "the profile," and he is one of them. He's 6'2", 180 lbs., all muscle, never been sick a day in his life, doesn't eat a lot of carbs/sweets/calories, exercises 6 days/week. He has 8 siblings and a huge extended family, and no one has ever had diabetes (not even Type 2), cancer, etc. His bp, triglycerides, cholestoral, etc. numbers are way better than mine, despite the fact that he's 9 years older than me.

 

I'm wondering if this A1C is a flag that he might have/or soon will have a T1 hybrid?

Jeannie
Mom to 14-year-old Katherine, dx'd at age 7
trisha01
Total Posts: 6,339
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Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

Re: What is a "normal" A1C?

Jeannie,

 

I think normal for non-diabetics, is 5.9% and less. Which textbook are you going by? Have a look see over at labtestonline.org  . That will give you a general idea. Also check the range on your hubby's lab work. If he isn't showing any signs of being T1, I wouldn't be too concerned about it, especially with what his A1c is currently. That pre-'betic stuff is for the birds. One is either or one is not.

 

But...also keep this in mind, that beta cell destroyment for T1's, starts about 2 years before diagnosis - per several physicians that i've asked the question to.

 

Trisha




Trisha

IDDM (Type 1 Autoimmune) 30+ years ~ Currently using MDI & Minimed CGM ~
Check out my diabetes blog!

  All brittle means, is that one has great fluctuations, which is pretty much hallmark for Type 1's. Some more so than others. - me
  First light brings a new day, new hope, new wisdom, and a chance to start fresh again. - me

If everyone were dealt the same amount of cards, there would be no challenges in life. Challenges are part of life's lessons, to teach us to grow in all aspects, and to learn what we need to learn, to make it in this world. Life was not meant to be fair. -me



~ New Type 1 Info ~ Insulin, Test Strips, Lancets, and other meds ~ Kidney Damage Info ~


Advisor
confuzzled
Total Posts: 87
Registered on: ‎04-24-2010

Re: What is a "normal" A1C?

 


energeticmom wrote:

What is a normal A1C for someone who does not have diabetes? My husband had routine blood work that showed his A1C to be 5.5, and that is textbook "pre-diabetic" (and some Drs. say either you are, or you aren't--none of this "pre" stuff).  I know that many people with Type 2 don't fit "the profile," and he is one of them. He's 6'2", 180 lbs., all muscle, never been sick a day in his life, doesn't eat a lot of carbs/sweets/calories, exercises 6 days/week. He has 8 siblings and a huge extended family, and no one has ever had diabetes (not even Type 2), cancer, etc. His bp, triglycerides, cholestoral, etc. numbers are way better than mine, despite the fact that he's 9 years older than me.

 

I'm wondering if this A1C is a flag that he might have/or soon will have a T1 hybrid?


That is a real hard number to pin down, but because I am type one and my son already has one auto immune disease, they check his on an annual basis, and it is always less than 5.

 

I am of the thought of you either are or your not, the "pre-diabetes" just means your in the early stages to me.

 

So I would say anything over 5 is something to pay attention to. It is not hard to do your own oral glucose tolerance test, just use soda instead of the syrup they use in the real test.

 

Given your husband is thin, and you have a child with type one, I would mention it to their endocrinologist and see what they think.

 

Typically, first response insulin production is the first to go and that is almost never caught by the standard test for diabetes, which is the fasting glucose number. If he is noticing that he gets very sleepy after eating, that is a red flag.

I went through this period for months and the doctor recognized the symptoms and kept cheking my fasting glucose and it was always normal. What was happening was, every time I ate, my glucose would sky rocket and then it would very slowly come back down till it was normal again and when they did my fasting glucose number it was normal.

 

Have your husband drink a 12 oz soda and check his glucose level evry thirty minutes after and it will be very telling.

According to this chart http://www.rajeun.net/HbA1c_glucose.html a 5.5 A1C is an average of 118, which is not alarming by any stretch, but it is above normal for a non diabetic in my opinion.

 

Also, there are medications that cause elevated glucose in most and others that cause it in some.

Oral steroids such as prednisone, cause elevated glucose in all, my kids have both had asthma issues and since I read about it and have the tester, I have checked thiers glucose while on these, and they both read in the upper 100's to lower 200's while on prednisone, which is normal for that drug.

 

After I started taking Lipitor, I noticed my numbers get out of whack and I had to stop it. Now Lipitor carries the elevated glucose level warning. Lots of people do not experience this, but some do and I did.

 

There is a lot of information available, unfortunately, most of it is geared towards the 90% that have type 2, and adult onset type 1 is rare, but with the anti-body tests available, it is getting much easier to diagnose and catch.

Adult onset Type 1 since 4-28-2006
mollythed
Total Posts: 5,903
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Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

Re: What is a "normal" A1C?

[ Edited ]

This diagram shows how type 2 diabetes is diagnosed.  It wasn't until 2011 that the A1C test began being used for diagnosis, so it's easy to find somewhat different numbers depending on where you look. 

Nowadays, any A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 can lead to a diagnosis of prediabetes, while 5.6 or lower is considered normal. 

 

It turns out that the A1C, fasting plasma glucose, and the oral glucose tolerance test each catch slightly different groups of people, but any one of them is sufficient for diagnosis, regardless of what the others may indicate.

a1c-march-2012[1].jpg

You can read more at http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/prevention/pre-diabetes/diagnosis.html.

 

 


"Molly" (aka mollythed)
Type 2 diabetes diagnosed in 1995, now managed with Lantus, Humalog and Metformin; diet and exercise.
My husband and three adult sons also have type 2 diabetes.





Super Advisor
Dennis1947
Total Posts: 811
Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

Re: What is a "normal" A1C?

I would say it All Depends on whom you listen too..

The ADA, The Gov't, who knows

and they keep changing the Formula's all the time..

 

I have this one that makes Pretty good Sense to me and thus I strive for 90's fasting, 120 Max , 2 hrs after and 5.5% A1c's for my T1 Insulin Diabetes

although rarely get those kinds of A1c's, at least it's a Goal  and I doubt most os use can get consistant BG's Below <6% with the current Tools and Insulins we have anyway..

 

 

http://chriskresser.com/when-your-%E2%80%9Cnormal%E2%80%9D-blood-sugar-isn%E2%80%99t-normal-part-2

 

 continuous glucose monitoring studies suggest that the ADA levels are far too high. Most people’s blood sugar drops below 120 mg/dL two hours after a meal, and many healthy people drop below 100 mg/dL or return to baseline.

 

This study showed that even after a high-carb meal, normal people’s blood sugar rises to about 125 mg/dL for a brief period, with the peak blood sugar being measured at 45 minutes after eating, and then drops back under 100 mg/dL by the two hour mark.

 

Another continuous glucose monitoring study confirmed these results. Sensor glucose concentrations were between 71 – 120 mg/dL for 91% of the day. Sensor values were less than or equal to 60 or 140 mg/dL for only 0.2% and 0.4% of the day, respectively.

 

Even the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists is now recommending that post-meal blood sugars never be allowed to rise above 140 mg/dL. Unfortunately, less informed groups like the ADA haven’t caught up with the science.

New Member
lshannyn
Total Posts: 1
Registered on: ‎05-28-2014

Re: What is a "normal" A1C?

Hi! I have the exact same situation! Did your husband get a diagnosis? Am so confused about the whole thing, but hope he is doing well, thanks!
trisha01
Total Posts: 6,339
Topics: 307
High Fives: 673
Blog Posts: 62
Solutions: 71
Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

Re: What is a "normal" A1C?

‎lshannyn wrote: 05-28-2014 02:34 PM Hi! I have the exact same situation! Did your husband get a diagnosis? Am so confused about the whole thing, but hope he is doing well, thanks *************** This thread is almost two years old. The OP has not been around for at least 1-1/2 years. Trisha



Trisha

IDDM (Type 1 Autoimmune) 30+ years ~ Currently using MDI & Minimed CGM ~
Check out my diabetes blog!

  All brittle means, is that one has great fluctuations, which is pretty much hallmark for Type 1's. Some more so than others. - me
  First light brings a new day, new hope, new wisdom, and a chance to start fresh again. - me

If everyone were dealt the same amount of cards, there would be no challenges in life. Challenges are part of life's lessons, to teach us to grow in all aspects, and to learn what we need to learn, to make it in this world. Life was not meant to be fair. -me



~ New Type 1 Info ~ Insulin, Test Strips, Lancets, and other meds ~ Kidney Damage Info ~