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trisha01
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Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

Here's a list of places for reduced costs

To All Oct-21-08 9:14 AM 10104.11 of 46

From MGinTN
Posts 303

My boss gets a publication called Bottomline Health, and this issue has a list of places to contact for discounted medications... not online pharmacies, but groups that can help. I know there were several posters out there inquiring about this stuff!

www.va.gov/healtheligibility/application for honorably discharged vets

www.tricare.mil for active duty service members

www.ncls.org/programs/health/drugaid.htm#discount 42 States have established some sort of program to provide perscrip drug coverage to low income older adults or disabled persons not qualified for Medicare

www.freemedicine.com This group will search for programs for you... one time $10 fee

www.ipsc.cc Indigent Patient Services - one time reg fee of $25, each perscription (usually 3 months worth) costs $20

Please note, I have not checked these sites out, and have re-typed verbatum what was in the publication. Hope this helps someone!



Blindsided at age 45. Determined that I will win this game.

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To MGinTN Oct-22-08 10:42 PM 10104.2Reply to 10104.12 of 46

From Dennis2008
Posts 1357

Thanks MG

I will add it to my Reference Library I hand out..

But, best to also keep it and issue it out when someone comes in needing it..

Unfortunately, Posting it once doesn't get the job done..

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To MGinTN Oct-26-08 8:33 AM 10104.3Reply to 10104.13 of 46

From apache575
Posts 6

MGinTN said...


My boss gets a publication called Bottomline Health, and this issue has a list of places to contact for discounted medications... not online pharmacies, but groups that can help. I know there were several posters out there inquiring about this stuff!

www.va.gov/healtheligibility/application for honorably discharged vets

www.tricare.mil for active duty service members

www.ncls.org/programs/health/drugaid.htm#discount 42 States have established some sort of program to provide perscrip drug coverage to low income older adults or disabled persons not qualified for Medicare

www.freemedicine.com This group will search for programs for you... one time $10 fee

www.ipsc.cc Indigent Patient Services - one time reg fee of $25, each perscription (usually 3 months worth) costs $20

Please note, I have not checked these sites out, and have re-typed verbatum what was in the publication. Hope this helps someone!


Blindsided at age 45. Determined that I will win this game.


Where do I begin to say thank you.

This is the first time I have tried this and it is amazing all the people

who have given their ideas. A couple of the sites that you sent may be of some

value to this situation. Thank you again!

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To apache575 � unread � Oct-31-08 2:06 PM 10104.4Reply to 10104.34 of 46

From Jekatt
Posts 15

I highly recommend Express Scripts. You can basically get a three month supply of any medicine for one co-pay.

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To All Nov-2-08 10:37 PM 10104.5Reply to 10104.25 of 46

From Dennis2008
Posts 1357

maybe we can keep this at the top of the boards for others to use in the future.. I'll add my list to the pile

Link> Health Insurance in Your State - American Diabetes Association
(note: www.diabetes.org/advocacy-and-legalresources/insurance/overview.jsp)

Ck with your County Health Dept.. ( Or Township office )/Family Services ( Our County has a Program for the Uninsured with $25 Co-pays )

Contact your Insulin Co.'s ( Lilly has a Lilly Cares plan- see link below )

Ck out Discount Drug Cards... You pay $50/mo and get 25-50% discounts. but, ck your Drug stores and confirm they accept it, etc and do the math to see if worthwhile..>AOL Search results for "Drug cards"
(note: another AOL search, addy too long)

Ck out > AmeriPlan� ( if you earn Less than $20k yr single and $27k couples )
(note: www.everyonebenefits.com/40590519)

NAHU - Consumer Information - Healthy Access Database (note: www.nahu.org/consumer/healthcare/insex.cfm)

Canadian Pharmacy, Canada Pharmacy Online Prescription Drugs Buy Humalog Insulin Without Prescription (Humalog btle. $44 /Novalog $54 , Lantus $84,) Rest of DB Items same Price or more than at Wal Mart..
(note: www.77canadapharmacy.com/Humalog.php)

> Canadian Pharmacy Canada Pharmacy Canadian Pharmacies Canada Pharmacies - Buy
<note: www.rxnorth.com/)

>"Canada Meds" (note: url is a search at AOL, can't see entire addy)

>Free Prescription Drugs | Need Help Paying for Your Medicine...
(note: www.freemedicinefoundation.com/application_form.html)

>>http://www.needymeds.com/

>Financial Help for Diabetes Care (note: diabetes.niddk.nih.gov/md/pubs/financialhelp/)


>PPARx.org- Help for Free Drugs (note:www.pparx.org/intro.php)

Free Advocate Blood Glucose Monitoring System with 150 Glucose Test Strips - D
$50 for 150 strips and A Monitor.. Rec'd by Niki in T1 Boards.. who uses them and likes them.
(note: www.americandiabeteswholesale.com/-strse-476/Free-Advocate-Blood-G)
(note: couldn't get all of url)

>Diabetic Supplies Online - Diabetes Testing Supplies - American Diabetes Whole ( $16/50 strips)
(note: www.americandiabeteswholesale.com/)

>blood glucose test strips at Hocks.. $17 per 50 strips..
(note: hocks.com/hocks_com_on_line_pharmacy/strips.html)


>SelectCare Benefits Network: Over 1400 Medications for only $20 per Month!
(note: myrxadvocate.com/?gclid=CKfaiazH451CFQJLxwoDWLJ4g)

>Direct Patient Assistance ( For INSULIN by Lilly Cares Program )
(note: www.lilly.com/products/access/direct_patient.html)

>Free Drug Card (note: freedrugcard.us/index.php)

>Novo Nordisk US - Patient Resources
(note: www.novonordisk-us.com/documents/promotion_page/) (too long to get all of it)

>Lilly Direct Patient Assistance (note: www.lilly.com/products/access/direct_patient.html)

>Welcome To Together Rx Access (note: www.togetherrxaccess.com/Tx/jsp/jome.jsp)

11/21/09...the notations I (Trisha) placed for Dennis, as the linkys didn't copy and paste, sorry
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To All Dec-2-08 8:45 PM 10104.6Reply to 10104.16 of 46

From Pbbar
Posts 1

To all Diabetics,

Depending on your Health Care provider, once you are finished with the Endo's visit, ask them for a few samples. They usually are more than willing to give them to you. These include Insulins, blood test strips, blood test meters, etc...

My Doc is awash with these items. The Pharmas make so much money off these why not pass them out for free at the Doc's office.

My Doc gives me 6 bottles of Insulin per year and its great.

However, if you want the real cheap deals, go to Mexico (interior) and stop inside a Pharmacia....I did this last year, here is what I found,

1 bottle of Humalog = 31.00 USD. Here in the USA, 1 bottle of Humalog (non insurance) 100.00 to 115.00 USD.

Go figure....

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To All Jan-14-09 10:28 PM 10104.7Reply to 10104.67 of 46

From peg11
Posts 94

There are A LOT of places to find resources for urgently needed medicines. Your PCP's office, free clinics, hospitals, and the Gov't listings for Social Security Disability Services, State Agencies for the aged and elderly. ALL of the web sites listed previous and mail order services that contract out to drs offices and health insurance plans. i.e. BlueCross/BlueShield and Express Scripts, CCS Medical, Liberty Medical,etc.

If you cannot find something come on back! We're sure to have found something or somewhere else to purchase reduced cost to no cost medical supplies! Hang in there GUYS and GALS.

LOVE and PEACE to ALL Peg

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To Pbbar � unread � Jan-14-09 10:56 PM 10104.8Reply to 10104.68 of 46

From peg11
Posts 94

Oh and on a personal note, pharmacists want their cut, and hate the fact that "they can't even break even and get paid well anymore! WHAAAA!"

Without places like Wallmart, Giant Eagle, the free clinics and the hospital pharmacy or drug assistance programs we'd REALLY be in trouble, right?

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Edited 1/15/09 by peg11

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To peg11 Jan-20-09 7:13 PM 10104.9Reply to 10104.79 of 46

From ajg2
Posts 20

Sorry for the sour note but:; CCS & Liberty medical are not worth the time to deal with i.e. lousy service and outdated product.

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To ajg2 � unread � Mar-12-09 11:50 PM 10104.10Reply to 10104.910 of 46

From felreesaa
Posts 6

I agree with you. Your meds are actually free either.. you still end up paying a copay or something.


felisia

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To peg11 � unread � Mar-14-09 7:41 AM 10104.11Reply to 10104.811 of 46

From MrMedSaver.com
Posts 3

peg11 said...


Oh and on a personal note, pharmacists want their cut, and hate the fact that "they can't even break even and get paid well anymore! WHAAAA!"

Without places like Wallmart, Giant Eagle, the free clinics and the hospital pharmacy or drug assistance programs we'd REALLY be in trouble, right?




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Edited Jan-15 by peg11
+
Peg,

I can understand your feelings here. However, as a pharmacist I'd like to give you some background on deeply-discounted generic programs, such as Wal-Mart's $4.00 generic program. I'm a pharmacist in an independently-owned pharmacy in Kansas. We make basically all our revenue from filling prescriptions . . . we don't sell groceries, clothing, tires, cleaning supplies, etc. We also offer a much higher level of service than most pharmacies, offering things such as free delivery, 24 hour on-call services, charge accounts, and Medicare Part D plan selection assistance. In addition to this, our wait times are drastically shorter than most other pharmacies, especially Wal-Mart's. Our average time to fill a prescription is about 4 minutes, and if someone has to wait any longer than 10 minutes we're usually out front apologizing to them.

Most of the drugs on Wal-Mart's $4.00 list cost pharmacies between $1.00-3.00. However, there other costs that go into filling prescriptions as well, such as employee wages, rent, utilities, computer equipment, etc. Several studies have shown that these costs are about $10.00-15.00 per prescription. So, when you add it all up, pharmacies are actually losing between $7.00 and $14.00 for every $4.00 prescription they fill. Of course, stores like Wal-Mart and Target don't care if they lose a few dollars on a prescription because they know you're probably going to end up spending $30.00-80.00 on other items whenever you enter their stores. But with other, smaller pharmacies, they don't have the ability of selling other items to make up for these losses. It's not that pharmacists "want their cut." Most of them honestly just can't afford to consistently lose this much money on these prescriptions.



Jacob Milbradt, PharmD



Edited for violation of Terms of Use. It is against our policy to allow advertising of any kind.

Edited by Forum Monitor 2


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Edited 3/14/09 by ForumMonitor2

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To All Mar-15-09 4:01 PM 10104.12Reply to 10104.1112 of 46

From MrMedSaver.com
Posts 3

Well, apparently I can't link to articles I've written? I'm not sure how this constitutes as advertising as no one contacted me before simply altering my post. I do think this topic is very important as well as confusing, however, so I'll just copy and paste the information. I'm also attaching a chart comparing prescription prices for different pharmacies from a separate article of mine. Hopefully, this won't be considered as advertising(?):



What Giant Retailers Don�t Want You to Know: The Real Scoop on $4.00 Prescriptions

About two years ago, Wal-Mart shocked the pharmacy world when they started selling several generic drugs for only $4.00 per prescription. Contrary to what many people believe, though, Wal-Mart didn�t invent this concept. Instead, they took the idea from K-Mart (who had quietly been selling several generic drugs at huge discounts) and they perfected it. Wal-Mart�s move resulted in an unbelievable amount of hype/publicity, and several other retailers have since followed suit. I�ve heard all sorts of theories as to the reasoning behind Wal-Mart�s decision to implement this program, such as:

They want to give back to the community.
They want to counter negative publicity regarding both the low wages and the meager healthcare benefits they offer their employees.
They are so enormous that their purchasing power and efficiency allows them to still make a profit off these drugs, even at $4.00.
They are attempting to drive other, smaller pharmacies out of business.
While all of these points do carry some merit, none of these were primary driving forces behind the launch of $4.00 prescriptions. Instead, the following are the real reasons behind this program:

Foot Traffic: Studies have shown that it costs pharmacies about $10.00 to $15.00 to dispense a prescription. This cost of dispensing includes things such as employee wages, rent, utilities, computer equipment, etc. When the cost of the drug is added to this, most $4.00 prescriptions cost the pharmacy between $11.00 and $18.00. So, why would any pharmacy purposely lose between $7.00 and $14.00 on prescriptions? It�s really all about foot traffic.

Most big retailers realize that the few dollars they make on a prescription are nothing compared to the profits the average pharmacy customer spends in their store shopping every time he or she comes to pick up a prescription. Because of this, it makes sense to use prescriptions as a loss leader.

Reinforcing the �Discount� Image: People already believe that everything is cheaper at stores like Wal-Mart, and the move to $4.00 prescriptions further solidifies this in their minds. When consumers have this type of mindset, they�re less likely to comparison shop. This can be a huge advantage to these corporations, as they don�t need to competitively price many products.

Attracting Customers without Insurance: Prescription insurance helps to prevent your pharmacy from overcharging you for prescriptions. However, if you don�t have insurance, comparison shopping is the only thing that will protect you from being overcharged on your prescriptions. When it comes to prescription prices, most people don�t comparison shop. And people using pharmacies with $4.00 programs have a false sense of security that makes comparison shopping even less likely. I�ve seen numerous examples where a $4 prescription saved someone $12 to $16 over another pharmacy; however, they also ended up paying an extra $20 to $40 on other prescriptions.

Now that you know the real reasoning behind $4.00 prescriptions, it should be obvious to you: the real motivation in selling $4.00 prescriptions is, in fact, to get your money. And these corporations will most likely wind up actually getting more of your money than if you had just gone to another pharmacy and paid a little more for your prescription in the first place.

So, am I saying that you shouldn�t utilize pharmacies with $4.00 programs? Far from it. After all, if someone is willing to fill your prescriptions for almost nothing, why wouldn�t you go for it? Few things have the potential to really save you money like these deeply discounted generic programs. If you do decide to take advantage of these programs, though, here are some important guidelines:

Get in and get out: Sure, $4.00 prescriptions can save you money�but not if you spend $100 on unnecessary items every time you set foot into the store to pick up your medication. To minimize this risk, have a plan each time you visit your pharmacy. Call your prescriptions in ahead of time to ensure that they�re filled before you arrive. Also, if you do need to shop for other items while you�re there, make a list of needed items before hand.
Comparison shop: If you don�t have insurance, this is an absolute MUST when utilizing pharmacies that offer $4.00 prescriptions.
Stick to one pharmacy: While many people are tempted to have $4.00 prescriptions filled at one of these pharmacies and have their other prescriptions filled at their regular pharmacy, this can be extremely dangerous. Remember, the only way your pharmacist can truly make sure your medications don�t interact is by having access to your complete medication profile.
Ask about price matching: If your current pharmacy doesn�t offer $4.00 prescriptions, ask them if they�ll match this price before considering switching pharmacies. Many pharmacies will match the prices of their competitors.
Attachments
Name: Rx_Price_Comparison_Table2.JPG Size: 92 K

11/21/09..note from Trisha, image may not copy over, sorry

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To MrMedSaver.com Mar-15-09 5:41 PM 10104.13Reply to 10104.1213 of 46

From morris older
Posts 7

If indeed, the link in your previous post contained only the information pasted into this one, then I, too am confused about why it would have been edited out by the Forum Moderator. I suspect there may have been more on the page that the link referred us to.

Even so, I am glad that you have posted this information. some states, like California, have laws against predatory pricing, which eliminates the possibility of $4 prescriptions here. Some people have criticized that law as being anti-consumer, and while they are right in the short term, there is a lot more going on, as your article demonstrates.

And although I do not take any of the drugs listed in the chart, it does confirm what I have seen in a number of other such studies--the larger chains can cost more than independent drug stores, with the exception of Costco, which seems to always come out lowest in these comparisons.

I have insurance and even with my now $750 annual deductible, just extended to generics as well as brand name, and even with the lower cost of gas, the local (chain) pharmacy is cheaper for me than the nearest Costco. Without insurance, however, I'd probably be over there, and following your advice on getting in and getting out. Local independent pharmacies? There are none left within 10-15 miles of where I live...

Morris

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To MrMedSaver.com Mar-15-09 5:43 PM 10104.14Reply to 10104.1214 of 46

From ForumMonitor2
Posts 3

MrMedSaver.com said...

Well, apparently I can't link to articles I've written? I'm not sure how this constitutes as advertising as no one contacted me before simply altering my post. I do think this topic is very important as well as confusing, however, so I'll just copy and paste the information. I'm also attaching a chart comparing prescription prices for different pharmacies from a separate article of mine. Hopefully, this won't be considered as advertising(?):


Your post was edited because the link you had provided went to your site where you also sell your services for a fee. This is where the no advertising part comes in. Please read the Terms of Use. What you have linked here is fine. Thank you.

Forum Monitor 2

Forum Monitor 2
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To MGinTN Mar-15-09 5:45 PM 10104.15Reply to 10104.115 of 46

From morris older
Posts 7

Here is the list that I assembled over on the T2 board and pull out whenever it is appropriate:

Free clincs and another Free Clinics web listing--type in your zip code to find local clinics.
(note: www.uniteforsight.org/freeclinics.php) (note: www.ask.hrsa.gov.pc/)

Prescription assistance--click on the Pharmaceutical companies link.
(note:www.diabetes.org/advocacy-and-legalresources/healthcare/healthinsurance/prescription-assistance) (note: unable to get entire linky)

Partnership for Prescription Assistance
(note: www.pparx.org/Intro.php)

Free Medicine Foundation
(www.freemedicinefoundation.com/)

Needy Meds
(note: www.needymeds.com/)

RxAssist and
(note: www.rxassist.org/)

RxHope
(note: www.rxhope.com/pap_info.asp)

Financial Assistance Information
(note: http://genome.gov/11008842)

The Medicine Program
(note: www.themedicineprogram.com/links.html)

I don't know a whole lot about these sites, and so would appreciate knowing which ones work best for you.

Morris

11/21/09...notations added by Trisha for Morris, urls didn't copy over)

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To morris older Mar-15-09 7:56 PM 10104.16Reply to 10104.1316 of 46

From MrMedSaver.com
Posts 3

morris older said...


If indeed, the link in your previous post contained only the information pasted into this one, then I, too am confused about why it would have been edited out by the Forum Moderator. I suspect there may have been more on the page that the link referred us to.

Even so, I am glad that you have posted this information. some states, like California, have laws against predatory pricing, which eliminates the possibility of $4 prescriptions here. Some people have criticized that law as being anti-consumer, and while they are right in the short term, there is a lot more going on, as your article demonstrates.

And although I do not take any of the drugs listed in the chart, it does confirm what I have seen in a number of other such studies--the larger chains can cost more than independent drug stores, with the exception of Costco, which seems to always come out lowest in these comparisons.

I have insurance and even with my now $750 annual deductible, just extended to generics as well as brand name, and even with the lower cost of gas, the local (chain) pharmacy is cheaper for me than the nearest Costco. Without insurance, however, I'd probably be over there, and following your advice on getting in and getting out. Local independent pharmacies? There are none left within 10-15 miles of where I live...

Morris


Morris,

While Costco usually has low prices, it's always VERY important to shop around for prescription prices. I guess that the take-home message would be that there's no such thing as the "cheapest" pharmacy . . . it really depends on which drugs you take.

And Moderator, thanks for clearing that up. I have a few other blog articles that I've written--such as on the importance of shopping around for the prescription prices--but these articles have links to other articles I've written, etc. I assume I'd need to re-write these and remove the links in order to share them on here.

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To MrMedSaver.com � unread � Mar-17-09 3:39 AM 10104.17Reply to 10104.1617 of 46

From peruvianpasohi
Posts 307

FREE HUMALOG...Still need a RX for it.


www.humalog.com/humalog-insulin-pens/humalog-kwikpen-insulin-pen.jsp

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To All Apr-8-09 10:02 AM 10104.18Reply to 10104.118 of 46

From CarrieBelle
Posts 34


Hi - I rec'd an email this morning from Bayer Easy Care -
they have started a new program to save money on test strips.
I live in MA so I can't participate in this program - but it looks like if you live
elsewhere in the US you can get a voucher to pay the co-pay
on your test strips up to $30.00 a month. I am thinking about
moving to RI -
The link is: http://bayersimplesaver.com/contents/home.aspx

It email also said they would send you a new meter if you needed one.
Happy Easter!

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To All Apr-9-09 8:31 PM 10104.19Reply to 10104.1819 of 46

From Jeska
Posts 552

Freestyle has its Promise program...I can't remember if it's already been mentioned. You get a membership card (from your doc, or attached to a new Freestyle meter box) and it saves you money off test strips. I have insurance, but even so, it knocks my co-pay down to $15. I *think* even for non-insured customers, you don't pay more than $20 or so, but don't quote me on that. May be something to ask your doc about next time you talk to 'em. :smileysurprised:)


Jeska
Type 1 Since 05/05
Lantus/Novalog

"When someone is impatient and says, "I haven't got all day," I always wonder, How can that be? How can you not have all day?"
-George Carlin

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To All Apr-9-09 10:18 PM 10104.20Reply to 10104.1920 of 46

From harleydeuce
Posts 1609

https://www.freestylepromise.com/?utm_source=Google&utm_medium=ContextualAd&utm_content=GoogleBrande...

This should link to the freestyle promise card you don't need anyone to do anything you can call the number and get the card sent, takes about 5 minutes and I'm the same as Jeska, I pay $15 now for my script of strips.


Diagnosed in 92

Refusing to die ever since.

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Trisha

IDDM (Type 1 Autoimmune) 30+ years ~ Currently using MDI & Minimed CGM ~
Check out my diabetes blog!

  All brittle means, is that one has great fluctuations, which is pretty much hallmark for Type 1's. Some more so than others. - me
  First light brings a new day, new hope, new wisdom, and a chance to start fresh again. - me

If everyone were dealt the same amount of cards, there would be no challenges in life. Challenges are part of life's lessons, to teach us to grow in all aspects, and to learn what we need to learn, to make it in this world. Life was not meant to be fair. -me



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