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Super Advisor
_julie_
Total Posts: 996
Registered on: ‎11-01-2009

Full body scans at airports

Just wondering. Here in the USA, they (hopefully) will be aware of the OmniPod. But I have both the OmniPod and the Navigator and going through a full body scan might be interesting. I'm going the UK next month, so I'll have to do the full scan in Manchester, England too. They don't have the OmniPod in the UK, so I could have some explaining to do.

Anyone with diabetic enhancements been through full body scans yet?
Julie
Type 1 since January 2008
OmniPod Insulin Pump/Dexcom G4 CGM/Apidra Insulin/Dabbling with Symlin
Long Lost Member
mgintn
Total Posts: 43
Registered on: ‎12-07-2009

Full body scans at airports

_julie_ (3/6/2010)
Just wondering. Here in the USA, they (hopefully) will be aware of the OmniPod. But I have both the OmniPod and the Navigator and going through a full body scan might be interesting. I'm going the UK next month, so I'll have to do the full scan in Manchester, England too. They don't have the OmniPod in the UK, so I could have some explaining to do.

Anyone with diabetic enhancements been through full body scans yet?


Diabetic enhancements... quite a way with words!

Haven't done the scan thing yet, I have a Animas pump, so I've gone through the please-step-aside-wand-and-extra-patdown-at-the-gate thing. Hoping to be going to Ireland/Scotland in 2011, so may well experience it at that point. Fun fun!
trisha01
Total Posts: 6,291
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Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

Full body scans at airports

Julie,

Read page 5 of the manual, regarding air travel. Some warnings, and some airlines may not allow it.

Trisha



Trisha

IDDM (Type 1 Autoimmune) 30+ years ~ Currently using MDI & Minimed CGM ~
Check out my diabetes blog!

  All brittle means, is that one has great fluctuations, which is pretty much hallmark for Type 1's. Some more so than others. - me
  First light brings a new day, new hope, new wisdom, and a chance to start fresh again. - me

If everyone were dealt the same amount of cards, there would be no challenges in life. Challenges are part of life's lessons, to teach us to grow in all aspects, and to learn what we need to learn, to make it in this world. Life was not meant to be fair. -me



~ New Type 1 Info ~ Insulin, Test Strips, Lancets, and other meds ~ Kidney Damage Info ~


Long Lost Member
catashbri
Total Posts: 7
Registered on: ‎11-30-2009

Full body scans at airports

Yeah, I've been wondering about that too...I'm still new on the pump & CGMS scene, so i'm not sure where everyone has their sensors and insertion sites, but mine are pretty nicely attached to my backside. Not to thrilled with the idea of some random TSA employee knowing that, actually...
Super Advisor
leehr
Total Posts: 2,186
Registered on: ‎11-01-2009

Full body scans at airports

Another way to think about the issue of flying with diabetes equpment........

Once when flying recently with Alaskan Air (Portland OR to Boston) I was asked if I wanted a screened body scan;I declined but felt how thoughtful of the ground security crew to offer this option. Perhaps if we ask other air lines they may have the same option?

When flying, why not consider placing the CGM and or pump in a location easier to "see" like upper arms?

In my mind, SAFETY come first - and if I were the pilot and crew I would want to know as sure as possible, that any little computer equipment was what it was claimed to be --just so I can continue to enjoy tomorrow and tomorrow......and.....
.
Freedom is NOT Free! Never has been.....
Joan
Type 1 Diagnosed Nov. 1957
MDI: Humalog & split dose Levemir
Ratio: 1 to 16, 18, 0r 20 daily


* Type 1 Diagnosed for 56 years as of Nov 2013
* 50 Year Type 1 Medalist Award from Joslin Diabetes Clinic (Harvard Medical School)
* Medtronic Paradigm Revel 523 insulin pump as of March 2011
* Insulin: Humalog
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Established Contributor
kellywpa
Total Posts: 2,750
Registered on: ‎10-31-2009

Full body scans at airports

_julie_ (3/6/2010)
Anyone with diabetic enhancements been through full body scans yet?

I will be having the TSA guys scratching their heads when I go thru the scanners without having diabetic enhancements - they will lock me up for sure if I try to go thru with a CGMS or pump!

Kelly
www.kellywpa.wordpress.com
Type 1, Diagnosed January, 1984
Dexcom Seven Plus CGMS

Pumping With Animas PIng & Apidra Since June, 2010

New Member
es335dot
Total Posts: 279
Registered on: ‎11-02-2009

Full body scans at airports

_julie_ (3/6/2010)
Just wondering. Here in the USA, they (hopefully) will be aware of the OmniPod. But I have both the OmniPod and the Navigator and going through a full body scan might be interesting. I'm going the UK next month, so I'll have to do the full scan in Manchester, England too. They don't have the OmniPod in the UK, so I could have some explaining to do.
Anyone with diabetic enhancements been through full body scans yet?


My pump sets off the metal detectors all the time. They seem to be pretty clued up about pumps. There are quite a number of transatlantic flights into Manchester, so I should imagine that they will know about patch pumps, even if we don't yet have them here.

Joel
Frequent Responder
t1forever
Total Posts: 175
Registered on: ‎11-02-2009

Full body scans at airports

This topic comes up again and again.

If you are flying, alert the TSA staff that you are diabetic and wearing a pump/CGM before you go through security. The TSA rules (in the US) state that you do not have to remove the pump, and the CGM transmitter must be detached prior to take off. Carry a letter/ prescription from your doctor stating specifically what equpiment you may need: pump, CGM, lancets, syringes, etc.

I fly a lot--in the US and overseas with my minimed gear and have not had a problem. They never ask to see the attachment site and will wand me, if I request it. Most of the time, I go through security just like evryone else.

I did get pulled recently in Detroit, after the bomber incident. The TSA folks knew all about the pump and wanded me, and hand searched legs, arms, pockets, etc. I explained the pump was in my pocket and she did not even ask me to pull it out.

The thing I have the most problems with is taking juice on board. TSA states that diabetic may take juice or gel for reaction over 3 ounces. After they did some extensive testing on a juice box, I now carry m&ms in a glad ware container for emergencies.
Long Lost Member
collectingblues
Total Posts: 127
Registered on: ‎11-01-2009

Full body scans at airports

sbogan (3/8/2010)
This topic comes up again and again.



If you are flying, alert the TSA staff that you are diabetic and wearing a pump/CGM before you go through security. The TSA rules (in the US) state that you do not have to remove the pump, and the CGM transmitter must be detached prior to take off.


Do you have a link to this, or where it says it anywhere in writing? My Dexcom rep said it was fine for flight, and she never removed hers or was asked to remove it.

The transmitter is a medical device, and it'll be a cold day in heck before I take it off for a flight. You can't convince me that a little thing like that poses a security risk.
(anon)
Total Posts: 0

Full body scans at airports

collectingblues (3/8/2010)
sbogan (3/8/2010)
This topic comes up again and again.

If you are flying, alert the TSA staff that you are diabetic and wearing a pump/CGM before you go through security. The TSA rules (in the US) state that you do not have to remove the pump, and the CGM transmitter must be detached prior to take off.


Do you have a link to this, or where it says it anywhere in writing? My Dexcom rep said it was fine for flight, and she never removed hers or was asked to remove it.

The transmitter is a medical device, and it'll be a cold day in heck before I take it off for a flight. You can't convince me that a little thing like that poses a security risk.


Here's some of the information the ADA Legal people post a while back.

Air Travel and Diabetes

What Specal Concerns May Arise?
"At this time, TSA has not provided any consumer information that explains additional screening for insulin pump wearers. TSA states: �If you are concerned or uncomfortable about going through the walk-through metal detector with your insulin pump, notify the Security Officer that you are wearing an insulin pump and would like a full-body pat-down and a visual inspection of your pump instead. Advise the Security Officer that the insulin pump cannot be removed because it is inserted with a catheter (needle) under the skin.� Hidden Disabilities: Travelers with Disabilities and Medical Conditions.

"However, the Association has received reports from several travelers which suggest that there is a new TSA policy subjecting all pump-wearers to additional screening. Specifically, on multiple occasions when TSA personnel have become aware that a traveler uses an insulin pump, they have done a comprehensive hand and explosive check of all of the traveler�s carry-on baggage, not just medical supplies. In light of these reports, we recommend that you allow extra time to be processed through airport security if you wear an insulin pump.

"The Association is pursuing clarification on this policy and will post this information on its website when it becomes available. If you have been subject to this policy, please view the information on our How to Get Help page and contact us."

Fact Sheet: Air Travel and Diabetes (PDF)